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Annual-Bluegrass-Resistance-Management

Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management

Check out this snippet from our new course-Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management:

“Poa annua is commonly known as annual bluegrass in North America, but to much of Europe it is known as annual meadow-grass. In the United States, it is colloquially often called Poa which is its genus. The genus Poa includes approximately 500 species.

Common examples include: Poa pratensis or Kentucky bluegrass (also known as smooth meadow-grass); Poa trivialis or “Poa triv”, which was once commonly used to overseed greens of the southeast and is also known as rough-stalk bluegrass or rough meadow-grass. Annual bluegrass is thought to have originated from a hybrid of Poa infirma (weak bluegrass) and Poa supina (creeping meadow-grass) that occurred approximately 2.5 million years ago in the interglacial ice ages of Europe.

Annual bluegrass is widespread around the world. Its presence has been observed on all continents, including Antarctica; though, it is most prominent in temperate climates.

Annual bluegrass is an annual comprised of numerous biotypes or “populations” – many of which are capable of perenniating, meaning that they may exist in a vegetative state throughout the year, all along producing viable seed. Though perennials are much less common than the annual biotypes, they tend to occur in frequently mown or grazed scenarios in temperate climates with adequate year round moisture.

Annual bluegrass is a common constituent of most maintained turf areas around the world. It is often considered a weed, but it is also propagated as a desired turf species. In fact, some of the most lauded golf greens in the world are composed of annual bluegrass, including: Pebble Beach, Oakmont, and the more recently converted Chambers Bay.”

The sample text above is part of our brand-new course on Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management. Annual bluegrass has historically been an important weed of many, if not most, commodity and specialty crops. The extensive reliance upon herbicides as the primary means of control has led to an almost overwhelming presence of herbicide resistance. There are very few commonly utilized herbicides that annual bluegrass has not evolved resistance to – albeit often in isolated or unique populations. However, the worrying trend is that for some turf scenarios, we no longer have effective chemical means of controlling annual bluegrass. This course will discuss the currently reported cases of annual bluegrass resistance to various herbicides and how to develop an effective herbicide program.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss herbicide resistance best management practices
  • Distinguish between the different classes of herbicides and their different sites of action
  • Describe how herbicide resistance is developed and how it can be avoided

This course is presented in full HD Video and is available 24/7 from the convenience of your computer or mobile device. Head to your state’s course offering page and get started on your continuing education today!


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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