AIA Releases Statement on The Troubling Trend of States Delicensing Professionals

(The above map shows states that are in the process of deregulating licensing requirements.)

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) released a statement last month on states rolling back on architect licensing regulations. The AIA strongly opposes any efforts on the reduction or the removal of requirements for the professional’s licensures of architects, calling the measures “risky” and “the stakes are simply too high.”

AIA listed the following principles for architects to uphold:

  • The health, safety, and welfare of the public depend on having licensed, continually educated architects.
  • State licensing boards are crucial to maintaining professional accountability and guarding against unlicensed professionals.
  • AIA works to uphold professional licensure in all 54 states and territories.
  • License portability for architects protects us in time of disaster.

AIA members are required to continue their education even after being licensed so that practitioners stay up-to-date on the latest techniques in the industry. The value of the architecture profession requires that architects uphold appropriate professional standards, and the AIA oppose any efforts on the government level to weaken or eliminate the professional licensure.

The AIA states a clear message:

  • Architects study and train extensively and become licensed to help ensure the health, safety, and welfare of all who occupy and visit the structures that they design.
  • All U.S. states and territories require a license to practice architecture to ensure buildings are safe for their occupants and the public.
  • The AIA believes the public is best served when state regulatory boards, duly constituted under state law, are free to regulate professional licensure on behalf of the public and consumers.

1-800-727-7104 | info@traininginstitutesedu.com

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New York Architect Renewal FAQ

How do I renew my New York architect license?

  1. New York architects must complete 36 hours of continuing education each three-year renewal period.
  2. The State will send you a registration renewal form. 

What are the continuing education requirements for New York architects?

  1. Architects in New York must complete 36 Hours of continuing education which must include 24 hours of HSW every three years.
  2. A maximum of 18 hours can be taken online and the remaining 18 must be taken a classroom setting.  

When is my New York architect license due for renewal?

New York architects must renew their licenses by the last day of the month preceding their birthday month.

Where do I find classes to renew my New York architect license?

Architects Training Institute offers New York and AIA-approved online requirement of a maximum of 18 of the 36 hours of HSW continuing education and other individual continuing education courses.

Who submits my New York architect continuing education?

It’s the licensee’s responsibility to notify the State.

1-800-727-7104 | info@traininginstitutesedu.com

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Acoustical Design in Modern Architecture Part III

This is a snippet from our Acoustical Design in Modern Architecture course. This course is approved for HSW credits nationwide. 

Using basic concepts of acoustics, there will always be three basic ways to attenuate or reduce sound.

  • If possible, we can replace sources of sound with others that produce less noise. In a similar approach, we can locate sensitive spaces further from generators of noise, to lessen the acoustic impact on them.
  • We can block sound from reaching a receiver with heavier, more massive materials and barricades that are less affected by the kinetic energy of sound waves.
  • We can interrupt the path from source to a receiver with light and absorbent materials to absorb the energy of sound waves.

Those three basic principles form the foundation for specific design strategies that follow, which apply equally to controlling sound in every building type. (Part III of III | Read Part I | Read Part II)

  • Resisting transmission of noise from the exterior into the interior of a space
    • Exterior noise still coming through the roof by vibrating membrane materials like metal roofing, will easily transfer through, since such materials are usually directly fastened to supporting structural members. Isolation clips can be used to allow movement between roofing membrane and structure and absorb some kinetic energy trying to pass through. This is good practice anyway, since those two components tend to expand at different rates due to solar exposure, and need to be able to move slightly differently anyway.
    • Noise will transfer through the weakest link in the acoustic envelope, whether it be a door, a window, or an air vent.
    • If air can get through a closed door, so can noise. Seal doors well and use airlocks to prevent direct transmission through open doors.
    • Windows are very poor blockers of sound. Glazing vibrates when struck by the acoustic energy of site noise, and that vibration passes the energy inward. Multiple panes, with air space between them, absorb some energy. Separated frames resist sound transfer by reducing structure-borne sound. But by far the most effective way to mitigate leakage of sound through glazing is to design buildings so noise sensitive spaces inside do not have to glaze directly facing sound waves generated by exterior sources of noise. If possible, minimize or eliminate large expanses of glass facing site noise sources.
    • All the problems mentioned above are still present, but two more can be added when windows are operable. Necessary clearances for windows to operate, also allow sound in through the gaps. If air can enter, so can sound. And of course, when the windows are open to the source of exterior noise, that is the largest acoustic gap possible.
    • If exterior noise cannot be eliminated and is still distracting, its impact can be minimized by adding a water feature to the site, thus masking the sound

 

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Acoustical Design in Modern Architecture Part II

This is a snippet from our Acoustical Design in Modern Architecture course. This course is approved for HSW credits nationwide. 

Using basic concepts of acoustics, there will always be three basic ways to attenuate or reduce sound.

  • If possible, we can replace sources of sound with others that produce less noise. In a similar approach, we can locate sensitive spaces further from generators of noise, to lessen the acoustic impact on them.
  • We can block sound from reaching a receiver with heavier, more massive materials and barricades that are less affected by the kinetic energy of sound waves.
  • We can interrupt the path from source to a receiver with light and absorbent materials to absorb the energy of sound waves.

Those three basic principles form the foundation for specific design strategies that follow, which apply equally to controlling sound in every building type. (Part II of III | Read Part I)

  • Reflect exterior noise with harder and denser exterior surfaces. The more reflective the face, the higher the percentage of sound energy reflected toward the source. Conversely, that results in a lower percentage of energy transmitted through the wall.
  • Absorb energy from exterior noise still coming through walls, before it can penetrate the exterior envelope. This requires the use of high STC ratings for materials or assemblies forming that envelope.
  • Prevent exterior noise coming through walls, by using two separate walls around the perimeter, not actually attached to one another. There is a lot of expense with this very effective solution, but it may be necessary if very sensitive spaces must abut exterior walls. 
  • Most exterior walls of modern buildings are well sealed and contain some type of insulation. The good news is that, if an exterior wall will resist the transfer of heat, it will also resist the transfer of sound energy.
  • Sensitive spaces can be placed on the interior and the perimeter spaces inside be reserved for less sensitive uses such as mechanical rooms, restrooms, corridors, etc. The walls surrounding more sensitive interior spaces can be highly acoustically absorbent as well, dealing at that point as a barrier to space to space noise transmission.
  • Absorb acoustic energy still coming through the roof before it can make it through the exterior envelope. This will require the use of high STC ratings for the materials or assembly of that roof, especially the insulation(s) used in the assembly.

More sound solutions next week!


 

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Acoustical Designs in Modern Architecture

This is a snippet from our Acoustical Design in Modern Architecture course. This course is approved for HSW credits nationwide. 

Using basic concepts of acoustics, there will always be three basic ways to attenuate or reduce sound.

  • If possible, we can replace sources of sound with others that produce less noise. In a similar approach, we can locate sensitive spaces further from generators of noise, to lessen the acoustic impact on them.
  • We can block sound from reaching a receiver with heavier, more massive materials and barricades that are less affected by the kinetic energy of sound waves.
  • We can interrupt the path from source to a receiver with light and absorbent materials to absorb the energy of sound waves.

Those three basic principles form the foundation for specific design strategies that follow, which apply equally to controlling sound in every building type.  (Part I of III)

  • This seems extremely simplistic, but while selecting a site for a project, some attention should be given to what is nearby, what kinds of sounds can be expected due to proximity to what generates them, and whether such sounds are acceptable or would need to be blocked or lessened.
  • If the site is large enough, locate structures far enough from noise generators, that sound waves have time to spread out and weaken before striking the enclosed spaces. Each doubling of distance from a source of noise lowers its sound level by 3-6 dB.
  • If possible, lessen or block the objectionable noise at its source. An example would be an enclosure, built around an auxiliary power generator on site.
  • Use dense screens of evergreen vegetation to help dissipate and absorb the kinetic force of sound waves entering the site. While these are not highly effective, they help somewhat and are aesthetically pleasing.
  • Use low walls or earth berms to deflect or totally block the kinetic force of sound waves entering the site. Redirect kinetic energy up, over or around the building. This is the function of concrete walls used to separate highways and high traffic streets from adjacent neighborhoods. Such barriers may not have openings and must block the line of sight between noise source and receiver, to be effective. The best that can be hoped for from such barriers, is lowering the sound level by 10 dB.
  • Block exterior noise that transmits sound by using the wall as a diaphragm. Use enough wall mass that it uses up a great deal of acoustic energy to vibrate the outside enclosure assembly. For example, tilt-slab concrete exterior walls block far more sound from nearby trains, than sheathed steel stud framing.

More sound solutions next week!


 

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Design for Your Climate

When designing a building in South Dakota, you need to keep in mind climate change. The summer heat can climb above 100*F, and the winter cold can dip below 10*F. You will want to be sure and use the correct envelope design. Envelopes have two design concepts; open frame and closed shell.

Open frame design is great for locations where the outside conditions are close to the desired internal conditions. designer will selectively add to the open frame to modify the subtle outside climate changes.

Closed shell is the option that will be used more by designers in cold climates. Designers using this concept start with a closed shell and begin to open the design to bring a little of the outside in. This can be accomplished with the use of windows and peek outs.

To learn more about Envelope Design, take our 3-hour online course available anytime, anywhere!

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New Hampshire Architect Renewal FAQ

Photo by: Gunnar Klack

How do I renew my New Hampshire architect license?

  1. New Hampshire architects must complete  24-hours of HSW continuing education
  2. Complete a renewal form and pay the $150 fee

What are the continuing education requirements for New Hampshire architects?

Architects in New Hampshire must complete  24-hours of HSW continuing education every two years.

When is my New Hampshire architect license due for renewal?

New Hampshire architects must renew their licenses every two years at the end of the licensee's birth month.

Where do I find classes to renew my New Hampshire architect license?

Architects Training Institute offers New Hampshire & AIA-approved online 24-hours of HSW continuing education and individual continuing education courses.  We also provide an 18-hour package that fulfills AIA requirements. Classes are available 24/7 on any internet capable device with the benefit of our friendly support staff to guide you through your renewal process.

Who submits my New Hampshire architect continuing education?

It is the license holder’s responsibility to notify the state.  A certificate of completion will be available for you to print at the end of each course.

 

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Virginia Architect Renewal FAQs

How do I renew my Virginia architect license?

  1. Virginia architects must complete  16-hours of HSW continuing education
  2. Complete a renewal form or renew online.

What are the continuing education requirements for Virginia architects?

Architects in Virginia must complete  16-hours of HSW continuing education every two years.

When is my Virginia architect license due for renewal?

Virginia architects must renew their licenses every two years at the end of the original licensing month.

Where do I find classes to renew my Virginia architect license?

Architects Training Institute offers Virginia & AIA-approved online 16-hours of HSW continuing education and individual continuing education courses.  We also provide an 18-hour package that fulfills AIA requirements. Classes are available 24/7 on any internet capable device with the benefit of our friendly support staff to guide you through your renewal process.

Who submits my Virginia architect continuing education?

It is the license holder’s responsibility to notify the state.  A certificate of completion will be available for you to print at the end of each course.

 

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Idaho Architecture Tour

Photo by: Vatsun

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, ID-1

We're kicking this list off with one of Idaho's oldest churches and marvels of architecture and design. The church, Mission of Sacred Heart, or Cataldo Mission, was built in 1842. In 1852 the church was taken over by Italian Jesuit, Antonio Ravalli. Ravalli constructed a new mission building with the help of local Native Americans. He hoped that having local tribes take part in the construction and design of the building would help them feel at home in the church.

This beautiful home was designed by Williams Partners, an architecture firm in Ketchum, Idaho. It is located on Knob Hill in Ketchum.

John Hendricks is a self-proclaimed Storybook Architect.  His homes are meant to make the viewer feel like they are in the English and French countryside. While this particular home can be found in Harbor Springs, Michigan, Hendrick's firm is located in Sandpoint, Idaho.

Macy Miller is a Boise, Idaho based architect who specializes in tiny homes. Her own home (pictured here) is 196-square-foot, built on a flatbed trailer. The home cost around $11,500 with the most expensive aspect being a $2,000 compost toilet. 


 

Do you need to renew your Idaho architect license?

Architects in Idaho must complete 12-hours of continuing education annually by their birthday in order to maintain their license. License renewal applications will be mailed to architects six weeks before license expiration. If you do not receive an application you must contact the Idaho Bureau of Occupation Licenses to receive a duplicate notice.
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Maryland Architects, Have You Completed Your CE Yet?

How do I renew my Maryland architect license?

  1. Maryland architects must complete  24-hours of HSW continuing education
  2. Renew your license online or complete the renewal notice you received in the mail.
  3. Pay the $76 fee to renew. NOTE: Individuals who renew online will be charged an additional processing fee based on their renewal fee.

What are the continuing education requirements for Maryland architects?

Architects in Maryland must complete  24-hours of HSW continuing education every two years.

When is my Maryland architect license due for renewal?

Maryland architects must renew their licenses every two years based on the date they were originally licensed.

Where do I find classes to renew my Maryland architect license?

Architects Training Institute offers Maryland & AIA-approved online 24-hours of HSW continuing education and individual continuing education courses.  We also provide an 18-hour package that fulfills AIA requirements. Classes are available 24/7 on any internet capable device with the benefit of our friendly support staff to guide you through your renewal process.

Who submits my Maryland architect continuing education?

It is the license holder’s responsibility to notify the state.  A certificate of completion will be available for you to print at the end of each course.

 

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