A History of Pest Management

The following is a snippet of our Pest Management Course. This course is approved for continuing education in several states. Click the link and choose your state to get started!

Think back to your history lessons about Black Plague in Europe. During the fourteenth century, there were plague outbreaks, millions of people died, and at the time it wasn’t understood why. Centuries later, it was discovered that the plague was a bacterial disease spread by fleas found in rodent populations. Besides biting rats, infected fleas would bite humans and other mammals. Bubonic Plague is still present in some rodent populations today, even here in the United States. But with rodent management and plague monitoring, only a few people a year are infected. 

Plant diseases have been important in our history, too. Late blight of potato is a fungal disease that was responsible for the Great Potato Famine in Ireland during the 19th century. Thousands of Irish people starved and more than a million migrated to the United States. The late blight fungus continues to be a major problem around the world but is now managed through the use of resistant cultivars, proper sanitation practices, and fungicides.

Modern chemistry was used to develop pesticides during World War II. At the time, DDT was hailed as the insecticide to solve all insect problems. Countless other synthetic pesticides were produced. During this time, the modern chemical industry was launched.  At relatively low costs, pesticides became a successful, primary means of pest control. Our ancestors controlled pests usually using brute force and manual labor. Thousands of years ago, chemicals that affected pests were discovered through trial and error. When sulfur was burned, it was found to affect insects and mites. Later, several other inorganic materials, like lead and arsenate, were used as pesticides. Toxic plant extracts such as nicotine from tobacco were also used. 

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Meanwhile in Florida, It’s Raining Iguanas

Photo by: @MAXINEBENTZEL / TWITTER

Temperatures in southern Florida are dipping below 40 degrees which has a strange effect on the invasive iguana population. The reptiles climb into trees and sleep on branches at night. As temperatures drop their blood circulates slower and slower until they are unable to control their functions. At a certain point, they are no longer able to hold on to tree branches and fall en mass to the ground below, unable to move once they've landed. If the iguana gets warm enough through the course of the day it will regain its ability to move and scurry away unscathed. On the other hand, if the iguana cannot get its body temperature above 40 degrees it will freeze and die.

While this may seem like a good way to lessen the numbers of an invasive species, scientists see a darker future for Florida iguanas. Many of the lizards have genes that allow them to survive colder temperatures, as other iguanas die the cold weather iguanas survive and pass on their genes. Some scientists believe iguanas will be able to withstand colder temperatures and begin moving north within 10 years.


Florida Pesticide Applicator Renewal Information

When is my Florida pesticide applicator license up for renewal?

Private applicators must renew every 5 years by April 30th.
Commercial applicators must renew every two years by January 31st

How much continuing education do I need to renew my Florida pesticide applicator license?

Every applicator must complete 4 core credits and a set number of credits depending on their license type. See chart for details

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European Paper Wasp in Wyoming

The European Paper Wasp first made it the U.S. in Massachusetts in the late 1970s. It wreaked havoc in Colorado and Utah for over 15 years before finally making its way to Wyoming in late 2016. The wasps are known for damaging ripening fruit and killing native insects. The European Paper Wasp is so detrimental to fruit orchards, producers have reported having no marketable crop left after an infestation. 

European Paper Wasps benefit from a lack of natural predators, a queen that becomes active in the early spring, before native paper wasps, and an abundance of man-made nesting habitats. European Paper Wasps like to make nests in protected overhangs, nooks, and cavities. In addition, the European species has thus far ignored all traps developed for native wasp species. These factors combined with the European Paper Wasps's broad diet range, allow the insect to flourish worldwide.

Solutions
The Utah State University Extension has found a few ways to reduce the European Paper Wasp population. Professor of Entomology, Diane Alston of Utah State University has found that traps baited with fermenting fruit juice attract the wasps. One farmer used a mixture of damaged raspberries, yeast, Squirt (the soda), water, and dish soap to effectively catch and kill the insects.


Wyoming Pesticide Applicator Renewal Information

When is my Wyoming pesticide applicator license up for renewal?

Private applicators must renew every 5 years by April 30th.
Commercial applicators must renew every two years by January 31st

How much continuing education do I need to renew my Wyoming pesticide applicator license?

Private applicators do not have to complete continuing education but they must retake the exam each renewal cycle.
Commercial applicators may either retake the exam or complete 24-hours of Wyoming-approved continuing education.

 

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South Carolina Pesticide Applicators, Are You Ready to Renew?

When is my South Carolina pesticide applicator license up for renewal?

South Carolina commercial & noncommercial applicators must renew annually by December 31. Private applicator licenses expire every 5 years; the next renewal deadline is December 31, 2019.

How do I renew my South Carolina pesticide applicator license?

  1. Complete the appropriate continuing education or a written category exam
  2. Pay the $50 renewal fee

How much continuing education do I need to renew my South Carolina pesticide applicator license?

South Carolina applicator continuing education differs by license and category. 

  • Private applicators must complete 5 CEUs.
  • 7A must complete 20 CEUs including 12 in 7A
  • 7B must complete 10 CEUs including 3 in 7B
  • 3, 5, & 8 must complete 10 CEUs, 3 in the appropriate category
  • All other categories must complete 10 CEUs

Where do I find classes to renew my South Carolina pesticide applicator license?

Certified Training Institute offers South Carolina-approved continuing education courses in an easy to use, online, video format. Courses are available 24/7 on any internet capable device with the benefit of our friendly support staff to guide you through the renewal process.

Who submits my South Carolina pesticide applicator continuing education?

Certified Training Institute will submit your continuing education to the state. You will receive a printable certificate for your records immediately after completing each course.

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It’s Almost Time to Renew Your New Mexico Applicator License

When is my New Mexico pesticide applicator license up for renewal?

December 31st, annually

How do I renew my New Mexico pesticide applicator license?

New Mexico applicators must renew their license annually by completing the state-required continuing education, a renewal application, and paying the appropriate fees. Renewal forms will be mailed the first week of November and must be returned by December 31st.

How much continuing education do I need to renew my New Mexico pesticide applicator license?

 

Commercial Applicators

4 General CEUs

Commercial Applicators with 7D (Wood Destroying Pest)

4 General CEUs & 4 Termite CEUs

Operator Technicians

0 CEUs

Termite Technicians (7D)

4 Termite CEUs

Public Applicators

4 General CEUs

Public Applicators with 7D (Wood Destroying Pest)

4 General CEUs & 4 Termite CEUs

Non-Commercial Applicators

4 General CEUs

Non-Commercial Applicators with 7D (Wood Destroying Pest)

4 General CEUs & 4 Termite CEUs

Pest Management Consultants

0 General CEUs

Pest Management Consultants with 7D (Wood Destroying Pest)

0 General CEUs & 4 Termite CEUs

Private Applicators

5 General CEUs

 

What are the fees associated with renewing a pesticide applicator?

 

$75

Commercial Applicators

$50

Operator Technicians

$50

Termite Technicians

$0 

Public Applicators

$75

Non-Commercial Applicators

$75

Pest Management Consultants

$15

Private Applicators

 

Where do I find classes to renew my New Mexico pesticide applicator license?

Certified Training Institute offers New Mexico-approved continuing education courses in an easy to use, online, video format. Courses are available 24/7 on any internet capable device with the benefit of our friendly support staff to guide you through the renewal process.

Who submits my New Mexico pesticide applicator continuing education?

Certified Training Institute will submit your continuing education to the state. You will receive a printable certificate for your records immediately after completing each course.

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Pennsylvania Applicators, Are You Ready to Renew?

When is my Pennsylvania pesticide applicator license up for renewal?

December 31st, annually

How do I renew my Pennsylvania pesticide applicator license?

Pennsylvania applicators must renew their license annually by completing the state-required continuing education, a renewal application, and paying the appropriate fees. License renewal applications will be mailed to you.

Where do I find classes to renew my Pennsylvania pesticide applicator license?

Certified Training Institute offers Pennsylvania-approved continuing education courses in an easy to use, online, video format. Courses are available 24/7 on any internet capable device with the benefit of our friendly support staff to guide you through the renewal process.

Who submits my Pennsylvania pesticide applicator continuing education?

Certified Training Institute will submit your continuing education to the state. You will receive a printable certificate for your records immediately after completing each course.

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Idaho Applicator Renewal FAQs

When is my Idaho pesticide applicator license up for renewal?

Licenses expire every two years on the anniversary of licensure.

How do I renew my Idaho pesticide applicator license?

Idaho applicators must renew their license every two years by completing the state-required continuing education, completing a renewal application, and paying the appropriate fees. License renewal applications will be mailed to you by the Idaho Department of Agriculture approximately 45 days before your expiration date.

Private Applicators

  1. Complete 6 hours of continuing education
  2. Complete the renewal application provided by the ISDA
  3. Pay the appropriate fees
    $10 RU Category
    $20 Chemigation Category
    $30 for both categories
  4. Photocopy the front and back of your license, showing your signature and the appropriate recertification credits.

Professional Applicators

  1. Complete 15-hours of continuing education
  2. Complete the renewal application provided by the ISDA
  3. Pay the $120 licensing fee
  4. Photocopy the front and back of your license, showing your signature and the appropriate recertification credits
  5. Provide proof of financial responsibility
    *Professional applicators who do not apply pesticides may submit an exception from responsibility form.

Where do I find classes to renew my Idaho pesticide applicator license?

Certified Training Institute offers Idaho-approved continuing education courses in an easy to use, online,  video format. Courses are available 24/7 on any internet capable device with the benefit of our friendly support staff to guide you through the renewal process.

Who submits my Idaho pesticide applicator continuing education?

Certified Training Institute will submit your continuing education to the state. You will receive a printable certificate for your records immediately after completing each course.

 
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Bed Bug Look Alikes

  1. Bat Bugs.
    Bat bugs are very similar in appearance to bed bugs and are best identified by an expert. The primary difference is the longer fringe hairs located just below their head. As their name suggests, they feed on the blood of bats, commonly found in attics. If the bats are eliminated and bat bugs are left behind, they will feed on both humans and pets.
  2. Spider Beetle
    Spider beetles are the shape and size of fleas, oval and dark brown. They may appear bloated and reddish brown as if they had just fed on human blood. You may assume they feed on human blood, but they feast on items found in household pantries during the night or in dark locations.
  3. Carpet Beetles
    Carpet beetles are small, round and brown with distinct wings. Their larvae look like furry caterpillars. Carpet beetles do not bite, but people with allergies to them can experience welts if exposed to their tiny hairs. Carpet beetles can damage fabric, furniture, carpeting and clothing that contain natural animal fibers.
  4. Booklice
    Booklice are commonly mistaken for bed bug nymphs. They are smaller in size, ranging from translucent white to gray or brown in color. They can often be found under wallpaper and along the sides of windows and window sills. Their primary food source is mold, pollen, fungi and dead insects.
  5. Cockroach Nymphs 
    Cockroach nymphs hide in cracks and crevices preferring to stay close to food, warmth, and moisture. They are most active at night. They appear white immediately after hatching or molting, and quickly turn a reddish brown, much like a bed bug. However, the cockroach nymph is more in the shape of a cylinder, whereas a bed bug is shorter and shaped like an oval, or apple-seed. Exposure to cockroaches can lead to asthma and trigger asthma attacks.

DO YOU NEED CONTINUING EDUCATION TO RENEW YOUR NEVADA APPLICATOR LICENSE?

NEVADA APPROVED CONTINUING EDUCATION 

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Nevada Pesticides for Medical Marijuana

What pesticides are safe for use in an enclosed locked medical marijuana production facility?

Growers should use "minimum risk" pesticides in enclosed greenhouses or grow-houses. These pesticides do not require registration because they are safe to use on almost any crop or site. The Nevada Department of Agriculture will still enforce all applicable statutes and regulations. It is the grower's responsibility to identify a pesticide that contains an active ingredient safe for products that are imbibed, has a label that does not prohibit use in grow facilities, and is registered for sale in Nevada.

What happens if a medical marijuana sample tests positive for pesticide residue?

The law requires medical marijuana production batches be tested and any batches that test positive must be destroyed.

Which pest control categories are appropriate for production of medical marijuana?

Agriculture Ground categories. B1 for insect pests, B2 for weeds, B4 for fungi pests, and B5 for vertebrate pests.

Which Restricted Use Pesticide (RUP) Certification should be obtained to apply RUPs to cannabis?

The Nevada Department of Agriculture does not have an RUP category specific to Cannabis. The Nursery/Greenhouse certification is the best fit for individuals who will apply RUPs in medical marijuana facilities.


DO YOU NEED CONTINUING EDUCATION TO RENEW YOUR NEVADA APPLICATOR LICENSE?

NEVADA APPROVED CONTINUING EDUCATION 

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Worst Pests Around the World

The Cane Toad (pictured above) is native to South and Central America but introduced to Australia and the Caribbean for pest control in sugar cane fields. However, since this amphibian is native to South and Central America it has overrun both Australia and the Caribbean where it has no natural predators.

 

Kudzu, or the "mile-a-minute vine" is native to Japan but was brought to the United States for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. The vine is fast-growing and often used to inhibit soil erosion. The vine is spreading at a rate of about 150,000 acres annually since individual vines can grow more than a foot per day.

Cotton-WhiteFly

The Cotton Whitefly is known for doing double the damage of your average pest. Not only do they feast on over 900 kinds of plants, they also transmit more than 100 different plant viruses. The flys are believed to have originated in India, however, it is hard to tell since they are now on every continent but Antartica.


Common Rabbits 
are native to Europe and North Africa but they can be found on every continent but Antartica today. In 1859 an English farmer brought 24 grey rabbits to his new farm in Australia, believing the rabbits would provide a touch of home and provide ample hunting. Within 10 years the rabbits had bred with local rabbits on such a scale that 2 million rabbits were shot and trapped annually without making a noticeable impact on the population. These rabbits have caused serious erosion of soils by overgrazing and burrowing. They are believed to be the most significant perpetrator of species loss in Australia.

Snakehead Fish

The Snakehead Fish have sharp teeth and an appetite for blood. They can grow to over 3 feet in length and lay up to 75,000 eggs a year. The fish can even survive for up to four days on land while searching for new bodies of water. Their ability to travel has allowed them to decimate food chains from Maine to California.


DO YOU NEED CONTINUING EDUCATION TO RENEW YOUR APPLICATOR LICENSE?

STATE APPROVED CONTINUING EDUCATION 

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