Pennsylvania Applicator Renewal FAQs

What are the continuing education requirements for Pennsylvania Private applicators?

Private applicators must complete 6 credits of core and 6 credits of category-specific continuing education.

When is my Pennsylvania private applicator license due for renewal?

You must renew your license every three years by March 31st.

Is there a fee to renew my Pennsylvania private applicator license?

Yes, you must pay $10 to renew.

Are your Pennsylvania pesticide courses state-approved?

Yes! All our courses are state approved. Approval numbers are listed after the course title.

Who submits my Pennsylvania pesticide continuing education to the state?

Certified Training Institute will report your course completions for you!


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education
State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7

 

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What do Michigan Golf Course Managers and Parks and Recreation Groundskeepers have in common?

They both need Turfgrass Pest Management certification!

If you’re thinking of a career in either of the aforementioned professions, you’ll want to begin by taking a comprehensive exam prep course to help you learn everything you’ll need to know to pass the Michigan 3A Turfgrass Pest Management Exam.

To pass the exam and be successful in your business you’ll need to know the best cultural practices for growing a healthy turf, how to accurately measure your treatment area, how to calibrate your equipment to stay within label rates, how to accurately identify damage caused by diseases, insects and vertebrate pests, and all the federal and state regulations pertaining to pesticide applications! That’s a lot of information to learn!

Fear not! Our on-staff horticulturist and certified applicator has taken all the guesswork out of the process by compiling this video exam prep course. With over 300 practice questions – including photo identification questions to help you learn to identify those pesky weeds – this course will provide you with all the tools you need to pass your exam and be successful in your career.

Busy schedule? No problem! You can take the course anytime, anywhere 24/7 from your smartphone or mobile device.  Just click on the "Start Now" button below.


Turfgrass Pest Management | Michigan Exam Prep

State-approved video course available 24/7

$89.00

8 Hour | Online HD Video

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Ancient Pesticides

You may think that today's methods of pest control are the most modern, but did you know that practically every method in use today has its origins dating back to B.C.?

According to a report of ancient Greek and Roman agrarian literature covering a period roughly 200 BC to 200 AD, protective seed coverings, olive oil, soda, smoke, ashes, leek juice, and salt were commonly used to control blight, mildew, and other common plant ailments.

Many substances were created from chemicals and minerals commonly found in plants, animals, trees and native soils.

Ancient agronomists used a variety of methods for pest control, including selectively placing plants such as bay, cedar fig, cumin and garlic in rows among their crops. Such plants were thought to kill or repel various insects.

Soaking seeds in leek juice was thought to prevent fungal diseases such as blight and mildew. The liquid distillation of extracts of lupine flowers and wild cucumber were commonly used as natural deterrents. Many insects commonly treated are similar to those we deal with today.

Such practices are quite similar to those in use by today’s organic gardeners and farmers wishing to avoid the use of synthetic chemicals.  Today's organic farmers often use seaweed to keep potato beetles at bay or plant a combination of onions, garlic, and herbs together to naturally prevent predators.

es: History of Pesticide Use; NY Times Archives


Online Pesticide Applicator Exam Prep, Worker Protection Standard, & Continuing Education

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What do Golf Course Managers and Parks and Recreation Groundskeepers Have in Common?

They both need Turfgrass Pest Management certification!

If you’re thinking of a career in either of the aforementioned professions, you’ll want to begin by taking a comprehensive exam prep course to help you learn everything you’ll need to know to pass the Turfgrass Pest Management Exam.

To pass the exam and be successful in your business you’ll need to know the best cultural practices for growing a healthy turf, how to accurately measure your treatment area, how to calibrate your equipment to stay within label rates, how to accurately identify damage caused by diseases, insects and vertebrate pests, and all the federal and state regulations pertaining to pesticide applications! That’s a lot of information to learn!

Fear not! Our on-staff horticulturist and certified applicator has taken all the guesswork out of the process by compiling this video exam prep course. With over 300 practice questions – including photo identification questions to help you learn to identify those pesky weeds – this course will provide you with all the tools you need to pass your exam and be successful in your career.

Busy schedule? No problem! You can take the course anytime, anywhere 24/7 from your smartphone or mobile device.  Just click on the "Start Now" button below.


Turfgrass Pest Management | Exam Prep

State-approved video courses available 24/7

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Wyoming Pesticide Applicator Renewal FAQ

When is my Wyoming commercial pesticide applicator license due for recertification?

Commercial licenses must be renewed every two years on January 31st.

Do I have to complete continuing education to recertify my Wyoming pesticide applicator license?

You may complete 24-hours of continuing education or retake the exam. If you retake the exam you must pass with a score of 70% or higher - Study ahead of time with online exam prep!

Do I have to pay a recertification fee?

Yes, commercial applicators must pay a $25 fee to recertify.

How do I recertify my Wyoming commercial applicator license?

  1. Complete 24-hours of approved continuing education or retake the licensing exam
  2. The WDA sends out renewal notices to expiring licensees in November. This notice must be signed and returned to the state with the $25 renewal fee.

Where can I find courses to recertify my Wyoming commercial applicator license?

Certified Training Institute offers online Wyoming approved HD video recertifiation courses. All courses are available 24/7 so you can start and stop at your convenience.

Who submits my continuing education to the state?

Upon completion of your course(s), Certified Training Institute will submit your continuing education courses to the state for you.


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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North Carolina State Researcher Finds Link Between Banana Pesticide and Ashtma Diagnosis

North Carolina researcher, Jane Hoppin, has linked pesticide use to asthma diagnoses. Hoppin studied women and children who lived and worked near a 40,000 hectare banana plantation in Costa Rica.

More than 27 ingredients were used on those bananas fields. Which adds up to more than 2,000,000 kilograms of pesticides. She says the pesticide exposure during pregnancy and afterwards affected the respiratory health of the women and children, especially in those with existing allergies.

Her conclusions come after years of research of 350 mothers and children pairs in Matina County, Costa Rica, a region known for banana production. She studied variables like poverty and exposure levels to determine her results. Her contributions are part of the Infantes y Salud Ambiental study in Costa Rica.

Hoppin is an associate professor of biological sciences at North Carolina State University. Her past research has focused on pesticide exposure and human health effects.

She highlighted her results at the North Carolina Society of Toxicology fall meeting in Durham. The meeting fosters communication and collaboration between professionals and researchers. Their mission is to disseminate knowledge about current toxicological issues as well as promote toxicological education.

Education is the cornerstone of professional success in the pesticide industry.

Speaking of which, North Carolina’s continuing education deadline is coming up. You must be finished with your requirements by December 31st. These requirements can be finished online.

North Carolina Pesticide Applicator Continuing Education Requirements

Structural Applicators are broken into 3 phases depending on the work performed.

Phase P - Household Pests
Phase W - Wood Destroying Pests
Phase F - Fumigation

Individuals licensed in one phase must complete 10 CCUs including 5 solely applicable to the appropriate phase.
Individuals licensed in two phases must complete 15 CCUs including 5 solely applicable to each appropriate phase.
Individuals licensed in three phases must complete 20 CCUs including 5 solely applicable to each appropriate phase.


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Indiana Pesticide Applicators, Did You Know?

You may think that today's methods of pest control are the most modern, but did you know that practically every method in use today has origins dating to B.C.?

According to a report of ancient Greek and Roman agrarian literature covering a period roughly 200 BC to 200 AD, protective seed coverings, olive oil, soda, smoke, ashes, leek juice, and salt were commonly used to control blight, mildew, pests, and other plant ailments.

Many substances were created from chemicals and minerals commonly found in plants, animals, trees and native soils.

Ancient agronomists used a variety of methods for pest control, including selectively placing plants such as bay, cedar fig, cumin and garlic in rows among their crops. Such plants were thought to kill or repel various insects.

Soaking seeds in leek juice was thought to prevent fungal diseases such as blight and mildew. Many insects commonly treated are similar to those we deal with today. The liquid distillation of extracts of lupine flowers and wild cucumber were commonly used as natural deterrents.

Such practices are quite similar to those in use by today’s organic gardeners and farmers wishing to avoid the use of synthetic chemicals.  Today's organic farmers often use seaweed to keep potato beetles at bay or plant a combination of onions, garlic, and herbs together to naturally prevent predators.

Anyone wanting to further their knowledge base and gain valuable continuing education recertification credits at the same time need only visit Certified Training Institute.

Indiana Certified Applicators must re-certify by December 31st.

The amount of continuing education you need varies by certification type. You'll find everything you need to meet State required continuing education as well as prelicensure and Worker Protection Standards (WPS) training (in English and Spanish!) for your workers.  It's all online and available 24/7 from any computer, smartphone or mobile device. You choose when and where to study!

 

References: History of Pesticide UseNY Times Archives,


Indiana Pesticide Applicator Exam Prep and Continuing Education

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Delaware Pesticide Applicators Must Re-Certify Before December 31st

Pesticide Applicators in Delaware must recertify every three years. They are also required to complete category specific continuing education by December 31st. Certified Training Institute makes it easy and affordable with a vast array of Delaware approved online continuing education courses. Individual courses, as well as Agricultural and Ornamental course packages, are available 24/7 for applicators who wish to beat the December 31st deadline in time to enjoy the holidays.

Interesting topics such as Right of Way: Pest Control, Right of Way: Weed Control, Cage Trapping Techniques, Disease Management in Enclosed Spaces, and many others are available online anytime.

Expand your knowledge base and earn continuing education credits at the same time. Printable certificates are available at the end of your courses. They’ll even notify the state of your course completion!

Certified Training Institute also provides WPS training (with handler materials provided through PERC) to satisfy all of your needs. There are two plans available, 1-25 workers for just $159 or an Unlimited plan for only $399. As an added benefit, they offer this training in both Spanish and English!


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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ESCAPING THE FLAMES

California’s recent wildfires not only impact human lives but wildlife as well. Larger animals such as bear and deer will likely find their way out of the forests seeking safety in other areas outside of the fire zone. Other critters such as rabbits, rats, mice, raccoons, squirrels, and gophers use their natural instincts and burrow underground to escape the flames.

Once the fires have been extinguished, these creatures will re-emerge, seeking safety from predators, as well as food and shelter in the nearest structures to have survived the flames. This means that areas such as attics, walls basements, roofs, and crawl spaces will become a safe haven. Not only are they a nuisance but these intruders could potentially carry disease which causes health risks for both household pets and humans.

Of course, the owners of these infested structures will be seeking knowledgeable and experienced professionals to rid their homes of unwanted visitors. Pesticide Professionals are able to expand their knowledge base and earn valuable California DPR and SPCB approved continuing education credits by taking the two courses highlighted below.

Cage Trapping Techniques - 3-hour online video course $49
This California DPR and SPCB approved course focuses on the use of cage and box traps in the management of vertebrate pests in both urban and suburban environments in California. Best practices surrounding appropriate traps for target animals, effective baits, and safe and humane use of traps will be outlined.

Vertebrate Structural Pest Control And ID4-hour online video course $59
This California DPR and SPCB approved course focuses on the fundamentals of wildlife damage inspection including identification based on habitat, routes of entry, scat, and tracks. It will help you understand the unique biological and legal risks that are involved with the inspection process in California as well as the proper equipment and PPE that should be used.


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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What Is Oak Wilt?

Oak wilt is a fungal disease affecting oak trees caused by the fungus known as Bretziella Fagacearum. It was first recognized in 1944 when over half of the oaks in affected areas of Wisconsin were infected and died as a result. The most recent evidence suggests oak wilt to be an exotic disease which arrived in the United States as early as 1900. Its exact origin is still unknown, possibly from Central or South America, or Mexico.

The disease currently affects much of the eastern and central US, As far north as New York and from Virginia to Minnesota to Arkansas, with infected areas as far south as the Hill Country of central Texas. It is particularly common in the Midwest. In Michigan where oak trees comprise about 10 percent of Michigan forests, it has been confirmed in 56 counties. This disease has the potential to impact the estimated 149 million red oak trees throughout 3.9 million acres of Michigan’s forest land. Red Oaks are particularly at risk, but this disease affects white oaks as well as other varieties. White oaks are a bit less susceptible when infected and sometimes live several years after infection.

The fungus is spread from diseased to healthy trees by insects as well as connections between tree roots.  It can also be spread during the warmer months as a result of tree pruning, hanging lanterns from trees, climbing spikes, using nails to attach items to trees, tree barking, and storm damage.  One such instance of storm-related transference was recorded in Minnesota and Northern Wisconsin in 2012 and 2013 where trees appeared to become infected as a result of a mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) windstorm which showed wind speeds of over 100 miles per hour. These winds damaged trees and carried the oak wilt spores which then infected other oaks. The areas affected included Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Keweenaw Peninsula in Michigan.

Symptoms vary by tree species but generally consist of leaf discoloration, wilt, defoliation, and death. You’ll notice a sudden drop or browning of leaves in the summer months. Some of which may be brown or green with partially brown areas while the leaf base remains green. Since other pests and pathogens may cause similar symptoms, it’s best to confirm your suspicions with lab verification.

Source: Wikipedia, Michigan State University Extension


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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