Nevada Pesticides for Medical Marijuana

What pesticides are safe for use in an enclosed locked medical marijuana production facility?

Growers should use "minimum risk" pesticides in enclosed greenhouses or grow-houses. These pesticides do not require registration because they are safe to use on almost any crop or site. The Nevada Department of Agriculture will still enforce all applicable statutes and regulations. It is the grower's responsibility to identify a pesticide that contains an active ingredient safe for products that are imbibed, has a label that does not prohibit use in grow facilities, and is registered for sale in Nevada.

What happens if a medical marijuana sample tests positive for pesticide residue?

The law requires medical marijuana production batches be tested and any batches that test positive must be destroyed.

Which pest control categories are appropriate for production of medical marijuana?

Agriculture Ground categories. B1 for insect pests, B2 for weeds, B4 for fungi pests, and B5 for vertebrate pests.

Which Restricted Use Pesticide (RUP) Certification should be obtained to apply RUPs to cannabis?

The Nevada Department of Agriculture does not have an RUP category specific to Cannabis. The Nursery/Greenhouse certification is the best fit for individuals who will apply RUPs in medical marijuana facilities.


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Worst Pests Around the World

The Cane Toad (pictured above) is native to South and Central America but introduced to Australia and the Caribbean for pest control in sugar cane fields. However, since this amphibian is native to South and Central America it has overrun both Australia and the Caribbean where it has no natural predators.

 

Kudzu, or the "mile-a-minute vine" is native to Japan but was brought to the United States for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. The vine is fast-growing and often used to inhibit soil erosion. The vine is spreading at a rate of about 150,000 acres annually since individual vines can grow more than a foot per day.

Cotton-WhiteFly

The Cotton Whitefly is known for doing double the damage of your average pest. Not only do they feast on over 900 kinds of plants, they also transmit more than 100 different plant viruses. The flys are believed to have originated in India, however, it is hard to tell since they are now on every continent but Antartica.


Common Rabbits 
are native to Europe and North Africa but they can be found on every continent but Antartica today. In 1859 an English farmer brought 24 grey rabbits to his new farm in Australia, believing the rabbits would provide a touch of home and provide ample hunting. Within 10 years the rabbits had bred with local rabbits on such a scale that 2 million rabbits were shot and trapped annually without making a noticeable impact on the population. These rabbits have caused serious erosion of soils by overgrazing and burrowing. They are believed to be the most significant perpetrator of species loss in Australia.

Snakehead Fish

The Snakehead Fish have sharp teeth and an appetite for blood. They can grow to over 3 feet in length and lay up to 75,000 eggs a year. The fish can even survive for up to four days on land while searching for new bodies of water. Their ability to travel has allowed them to decimate food chains from Maine to California.


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Michigan Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs

Photograph by Deepak Matadha, Rutgers University.

MSU is asking Michigan residents in the northern lower peninsula and upper peninsula to report all sightings of the brown marmorated stink bug.

The Pest
Adult brown marmorated stink bugs are shield-shaped with brown mottling. They are between 14 and 17mm long, about the size of a dime. The bug was originally introduced to North America in 1996 but did not reach Michigan until 2010.

Damage
The brown marmorated stink bug feeds on a variety of fruits, vegetables, and crops, causing pitting, scarring, and a mealy texture of affected plants. The insect has also been known to feed on leaves which can kill a plant entirely. Aside from the physical damage, feeding wounds provide an entryway for disease to attack the host plant.

What to Do
If you are located in an area that is not marked "well established" on the map below, please contact the MSU extension office through this site to report any sightings of the brown marmorated stink bug.


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Maryland’s Corn Earworm

The corn earworm is incredibly detrimental to corn and soy plants across the country, in fact, it is considered the most costly crop pest in North America. The worms eat corn all summer and shift to soybeans in the winter where they lay their eggs. 

The Pest
Young earworms live on the fruit of a plant and feed with other larvae. However, as they age they become territorial and cannibalize other larvae. Once the larvae mature they drop to the ground, burrow into the soil, and pupate. This process takes about 13 days and occurs during the summer. The adult is a moth in varied color. While they only live for 5 to 15 days they lay between 500 to 3000 eggs.

Damage
Corn earworms damage a wide variety of plants from the obvious corn to asparagus, artichokes, cabbage, cantaloupes, cucumbers, potatoes, watermelon and more. Earworm larvae feed on the fruit of most plants, making it impossible for the plant to reproduce. Larvae also feed on new growth and burrow into fruit. To make matters worse, larvae often burrow into a fruit, eat briefly, and then burrow into another fruit until the entire crop is damaged.

Treatment
Earworms are often treated with insecticides, especially in corn fields where more than 5% of the plants are bearing new silk. However, because this pest is often treated with insecticides, many corn earworms have become resistant to a variety of insecticides. Another method of controlling earworms is trap cropping. Farmers using this method plant enticing crops around the crop they wish to protect. This encourages earworms and adult moths to feed on the "trap crops" rather than the profit crops. 


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Hemlock Woolly Adelgid a North Carolina Pest

Hemlock trees used to be some of the most common and largest trees in the North Carolina mountains. Unfortunately, the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid is threatening the continued existence of these beautiful trees. The pest is native to Asia but has been spreading throughout the east coast since it was first found in Virginia in 1950.

The Pest
Adelgids are small, less than 1/16th of an inch long and vary in color from dark red to purple. As the insect matures it produces a wool-like wax covering to protect itself and its eggs from predators and prevent them from drying out. This wool-like covering is the most obvious sign of infestation. 

Damage
 The trees typically die within 4 to 10 years of infestation in the north and only 3 to 6 years in southern states. The insects are usually located near the bark towards the base of the needles. The adelgids insert their piercing-sucking mouthparts into the base of needles and removing plant fluids. Moderate infestations reduce tree health, severe infestations cause premature needle drop, dieback, and finally death of trees.

Treatment
The best time to manage this pest is late September through October. Registered insecticides can prove effective against overwintering females and a mid-to-late June application can reduce the number of developing nymphs. Early spring soil injections near large trees can also prove effective.

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Mosquito Populations Expected to Spike Because of Hurricane Harvey

 

The Houston area is expecting a major increase in their mosquito population as water left over from the hurricane recedes and forms pools in low areas. The Director of the Mosquito Control Division for Harris County's Health Department expects mosquito populations to increase drastically a week or two after the hurricane water recedes. This influx is especially worrying because the West Nile Virus was already present in Houston before the floods.

Harris County plans to spray affected areas continuously until mosquito populations return to normal. Residents are being asked to drain any standing pools of water in their yards that may have formed in tires, kid pools, and even dog bowls. Residents are also encouraged to place mosquito donuts in any standing water that cannot be drained. The donuts kill larvae but do not harm anything else in the area.


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Montana’s Japanese Beetle Quarantine

Photo by: Bruce Marlin

The Popilla japonica Newman or Japanese Beetle is a destructive plant pest that is very difficult and expensive to control. Beetle grubs feed on grass roots and destroy lawns, pastures, and golf courses. Adults feed on foliage, flowers, and fruits of more than 300 different varieties. Popilla japonica Newman infestation is especially harmful to plant life because they attack plants in the larval and adult stages, both above and below ground. 

The beetles first came to the united states in 1916 through New Jersey. Since their initial introduction, the beetle has spread across the eastern states to the Mississippi River. Montana has not been infected with the insect yet due to a state quarantine on incoming planes. 

There are several methods for controlling Japanese beetle populations. One method is physical removal and exclusion, where the beetles are physically removed from plants. This method is best used on cool mornings when the beetles are inactive. Cultural control can also be effective. Female beetles seek irrigated areas for laying eggs so the key is to avoid irrigating crops during peak beetle flight activity. This method will reduce the grub population. Finally, tiphid wasps are used as a biological control.  These wasps attack young grubs in late summer prohibiting the grubs from damaging lawns and maturation into adulthood.

 


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California Eucalyptus Pest

The Redgum Lerp Psyllid is an invasive species from Australia that made its way to California in 1998. The insect is also found in Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, and Mexico. Psyllid adults and nymphs suck plant phloem sap through strawlike mouths and secrete honeydew that causes dark mold growth and premature leaf drop. As the leaves fall off of the trees the trees become increasingly weaker due to lack of sunlight.

The Redgum Lerp Psyllid is mainly being managed by an introduced, psyllid-specific parasitic wasp along the California coasts. Adequate irrigation and limiting nitrogen can also be used to manage psyllid numbers. While systemic insecticides have been helpful in some areas, their efficiency has been disappointing and varied.


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Private Applicators must complete 15 credit hours
Structural Applicators must complete 3 credit hours
Noncommercial & Commercial Applicators must complete 5 credit hours

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New Jersey Applicator Renewal FAQ

How do I renew my New Jersey commercial applicator license?

  1. Complete the required continuing education (see details below) or retake the state exams
  2. Complete the renewal form sent to you by the state
  3. Mail the renewal form and a check for $80 to the New Jersey state department

What continuing education is required to renew my New Jersey commercial applicator license?

Applicators must complete 8 units (4 hours) of core classes and 16 units (8 hours) per category.

Where do I find core classes to renew my New Jersey commercial applicator license?

Certified Training Institute offers online, New Jersey-Approved core continuing education classes. All classes are available 24/7 on any internet capable device. After completing each course you will have access to a printable certificate which must be mailed the state upon renewal.

When does my New Jersey commercial applicator license expire?

Your license will expire 5 years after the date of issuance on October 31st.



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Mississippi State University and Certified Training Institute Partner to Bring Quality Training to Pesticide Professionals

Mississippi State University Extension is going further in the production of cutting-edge online training and continuing education for pesticide applicators nationwide. MSU Extension services have partnered with Certified Training Institute in the creation of a nationwide pesticide applicator training program prepared by professors, graduate students, and industry specialists. These subject matter experts present training using green screen and other video technologies which give classes a live-instructor feel. Courses are then produced and delivered to pesticide applicators and agriculture professionals across the country.

This program was initially spearheaded a little over a year ago by Pesticide Education Coordinator Gene Merkel and the Extension Program at Mississippi State University. Since its creation, course modules have been submitted to states accepting online continuing education and recertification programs across the nation. Currently, the “pilot program”, a 10-hour Core Standards Training, has been adopted by twenty-two states and completed by hundreds of students.

Mississippi State University Extension and Certified Training Institute will continue to expand current course offerings to include training for all categories over the coming years. In fact, several category-specific classes are currently in production including Insect Sampling Techniques, Agronomic Pests of Rice, Cotton, Soybeans, and Corn, Plant Pathogens, and Non-Native Wood Borers and Their Management. Course filming and production is scheduled to continue throughout the fall on topics such as Structural Pest Control, Herbicide Technology, and Commercial Turf Grass.

All courses produced by this partnership are mobile friendly, high-quality video with on-screen instructors, much like a classroom setting. However, pesticide professionals can access online training 24/7, meaning classes can be completed at their own pace. Applicators may also revisit portions of training from a phone or tablet at their own leisure, allowing for on-the-job reference.



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