California QAL or QAC Complete 20 Hour Bundle – Mosquito Control

$249.00

Online HD Video | Category K
This course bundle is designed for the Qualified Applicator License or Certificate holder. (QAL or QAC) This course bundle contains the required 4 hours of law and 16 hours of training geared toward mosquito control (Category K) and general pesticide safety. All courses are approved by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

Description

This course bundle is designed for the Qualified Applicator License or Certificate holder. (QAL or QAC) This course bundle contains the required 4 hours of law and 16 hours of training geared toward mosquito control (Category K) and general pesticide safety. All courses are approved by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

BUNDLE CONTENTS

Laws

  • Reading the Pesticide Label: Beyond the Basics – 2 hours
  • Federal Pesticide Laws – 1 hour
  • Pesticide Labeling – 1 hour

Mosquito Control (Category K)

  • Mosquito Identification – 3 hours
  • Intro to Mosquito Control – 2 hours
  • Mosquito Management and Control – 2 hours

General Pesticide Safety

  • Pesticide Application Procedures – 1 hour
  • Pesticides in the Environment – 1 hour
  • Pesticide Formulations – 1 hour
  • Pesticide Hazards and First Aid – 1 hour
  • Pest Management – 1 hour
  • Planning the Pesticide Application – 1 hour
  • Personal Protective Equipment and Emergency Response – 1 hour
  • Transportation, Storage, Security, and Professional Conduct – 1 hour
  • Application Equipment and Calibration – 1 hour

 


Reading the Pesticide Label: Beyond the Basics

Course Description

This training will cover many sections of a pesticide label and safety data sheets. Labels are increasing in complexity and depth of information. It is never suggested that anyone try to memorize a pesticide label. By reviewing parts of a label and recognizing label language and use, we hope that you feel more comfortable with the information on pesticide labels and feel confident in understanding the information the present. Many examples of labels are used in this training that cover a variety of types of pesticides and also represent a variety of sites. It’s essential that we look at REAL label language and not simply make generic statements to evaluate.

There is no endorsement for any company or product by representation of information in this training. All material presented is for educational purposes only and is not intended to purposefully include or exclude any company, tradename, product, use, proprietary, or any other information. Whenever you have questions about interpretations of label language, we encourage you to contact your local extension, land-grant university, department of agriculture, product dealer, or the manufacturer for more information.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss different types of pesticide registrations.
  • Identify where to find specific information on the pesticide label.
  • Identify pests and site usage according to the label, and recognize information on safety data sheets.

Chapter 1

Lesson 1 

  • Overview and Objectives
  • EPA Approval
  • Testing of Products
  • Types of Pesticides
  • Pesticide Registrations
  • When to Read the Pesticide Label
  • Parts of the Label: Required Information
  • Parts of the Label: Use Classification Statement

Lesson 2 

  • Parts of the Label: Use Classification Statement (cont.)
  • Agricultural vs Non-Agricultural Use
  • A Closer Look at Personal Protective Equipment
    • Respirator Requirements
    • First Aid Statements
    • Exposure Precautions
    • Physical and Chemical Hazards

Lesson 3 

  • Directions for Use
  • How to Use this Product
    • Target Pests
    • Soil Limitations
    • Integrated Pest Management
  • Other Product Specific Statements
  • Environmental Hazards
  • Endangered Species Protection
  • Pollinator Protection
  • Application Rates
    • Target Crop Rates
    • Host Plant Rates
    • Soil Type
    • Other Application Notes

Lesson 4 

  • Application Rates (cont.)
    • Deviation
  • Tank Mixing
    • Compatibility Test
    • Phytotoxicity Warning
    • Additional Protections
  • Storage and Disposal
  • Safety Data Sheets

Lesson 5

  • Label Review

Final Assessment 


Federal Pesticide Laws

Course Description

Pesticides are hazardous substances that can cause serious harm if used improperly. Pesticides are regulated to utilize their benefits while protecting public health and welfare and preventing harm to the environment. Federal and state pesticide laws and regulations control the labeling, sale and distribution, storage, transportation, use and disposal in the best public interest. This course addresses the requirements set forth by federal regulations. Pesticide applicators are responsible for learning about and complying with all regulations.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Be able to describe and integrate important regulatory requirements related to labeling, hazard management, environmental issues, and application procedures.
  • Distinguish between restricted-use and general-use pesticide classifications.
  • Explain the importance of maintaining accurate records of pesticide application and employee training.

Chapter 1 – Federal Pesticide Laws

Lesson 1 

  • The Need for Regulation
  • Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act
  • Pesticide Registration
  • Tolerances
  • Pesticide Reregistration

Lesson 2 

  • Violations and Federal Penalties
  • Federal Pesticide Regulations under FIFRA
  • Other Federal Laws
  • Federal Recordkeeping Requirements

Final Assessment 


Pesticide Labeling

Course Description

The pesticide label is the main method of communication between a pesticide manufacturer and pesticide users. The information printed on and attached to the pesticide container is the label. By law, pesticide users are required to comply with all instructions and use directions found on the pesticide product label. Labeling includes the label itself plus all other
information about the product referenced on the label and given when you buy the product. Pesticide labeling includes instructions on how to use the product safely and correctly.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Interpret the meaning of label signal words, symbols, and their relative hazard levels.
  • Accurately identify the common, chemical, and brand or trade name of a pesticide.
  • Describe how to interpret other documents and online resources referenced on the label.

Chapter 1 – Pesticide Labeling

Lesson 1 

  • EPA Approval of Pesticide Labeling
  • The Label
  • Types of Pesticide Registration
  • When to Read the Pesticide Label

Lesson 2 

  • Parts of the Label
  • Other Label Resources
  • Safety Data Sheets

Final Assessment 


Mosquito Identification: Aedes, Anopheles, Culex, Mansonia, and Psorophora

Course Description

Correct identification of each mosquito species is an important step to managing the mosquito population in your area. Each species of mosquito has its own preferred habitat and breeding environment. This course covers the preferred habitat, breeding ground, and physiological differences between five major species of mosquitoes found throughout the United States.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the differences between the five major mosquito species in the United States.
  • Identify each of the mosquitoes covered in this course.

Chapter 1 – Aedes

Lesson 1 

  • Mosquito Identification – Aedes
  • Aedes vexans
  • Aedes japonicus

Lesson 2 

  • Aedes togoi
  • Aedes angustivittatus
  • Aedes atlanticus
  • Aedes canadensis
  • Aedes dorsalis

Lesson 3 

  • Aedes infirmatus
  • Aedes melanimon
  • Aedes scapularis
  • Aedes serratus
  • Aedes sollicitans
  • Aedes taeniorhynchus

Lesson 4 

  • Aedes trivittatus
  • Aedes triseriatus
  • Aedes aegypti
  • Aedes albopictus

Chapter 2 – Anopheles

Lesson 1 

  • Mosquito Identification – Anopheles
  • Anopheles aztecus
  • Anopheles freeborni
  • Anopheles pseudopunctipennis
  • Anopheles punctimacula

Lesson 2 

  • Anopheles punctipennis
  • Anopheles quadrimaculatus
  • Anopheles albimanus
  • Anopheles darlingi

Chapter 3 – Culex

Lesson 1 

  • Mosquito Identification – Culex
  • Coquilettidia pertubans
  • Culex nigripalpus
  • Culex pipiens

Lesson 2 

  • Culex quinquefaciatus
  • Culex restuans
  • Culex salinarius
  • Culex tarsalis

Lesson 3 

  • Culx erraticus
  • Culiseta melanura
  • Culiseta inornata

Chapter 4 – Mansonia Psorophora

Lesson 1 

  • Mansonia titillans
  • Psorophora ferox
  • Psorophora columbiae
  • Psorophora ciliata
  • Psorophora howardii

Final Assessment 


Intro to Mosquito Control

Course Description

Mankind has been battling mosquitoes since before the first settlers landed on the continent. Mosquitoes are vectors for a multitude of diseases that are harmful to humans, livestock, and pets. To effectively manage a mosquito population as part of an integrated pest management plan applicators must be familiar with mosquito physiology, the lifecycle of the mosquito, and various collection and surveillance methods for both adult mosquitoes and larvae. It is also important to have a good understanding of the diseases that are commonly vectored by mosquitoes. The course will talk about surveillance methods, mosquito anatomy, and touch on the diseases that are most commonly vectored by mosquitoes in the United States.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Describe the different stages in the mosquito lifecycle.
  • Explain the differences between male and female mosquitoes.
  • Suggest different surveillance and collection tactics to efficiently trap mosquitoes in the target area.
  • List and describe several commonly mosquito vectored diseases.

Chapter 1 – Mosquito Physiology and Lifecycle

Lesson 1

  • Male vs Female Mosquitoes
  • Mosquito Lifecycle
  • Larvae Anatomy
  • Mosquito Pupa

Chapter 2 – Adult Mosquito Anatomy

Lesson 1

  • Basic Mosquito Anatomy
  • Tools for Identification

Chapter 3 – Mosquito Collection and Surveillance

Lesson 1

  • Capturing a Mosquito for ID
  • Strategies for Collection
  • Adult Mosquito Surveillance
  • Collecting/Storing Without Damaging

Lesson 2

  • Capturing a Mosquito for ID
  • Adult Trap Collection

Chapter 4 – Egg & Larval Collection & Surveillance

Lesson 1

  • Larval Mosquito Surveillance
    • Dipper Sampling for Larvae
    • Population Density
  • Mosquito Egg Surveillance
    • Oviposition Trap

Chapter 5 – Mosquito-Borne Diseases

Lesson 1

  • Encephalitis
  • West Nile Encephalitis Virus
  • St. Louis Encephalitis
  • Eastern Equine Encephalitis
  • La Crosse Encephalitis

Lesson 2

  • Jamestown Canyon Virus
  • Zika Virus
  • Malaria
  • Chikungunya
  • Yellow Fever
  • Dirofilaria immitis – Dog Heartworm
  • Wuchereria bancrofti – Lymphatic Filariasis

Final Assessment 


Mosquito Management & Control 

Course Description

Mosquito management is a daunting task for many applicators. When done correctly, outdoor areas such as parks and neighborhood common areas can be a perfect place for people to relax. When mosquito management is done incorrectly or isn’t done at all, mosquitoes can make public spaces unusable. This course will discuss common methods of mosquito controls, everything from physical controls, to pesticides, to record keeping, all as part of a solid integrated pest management approach to mosquito control.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the different types of control methods for managing mosquito populations.
  • Discuss the different types of insecticides available for both larval and adult control of mosquitoes.
  • Identify and describe the different kinds of equipment commonly used for mosquito control pesticide applications.
  • Discuss several ways to evaluate the efficacy of the different mosquito control methods implemented.

Chapter 1

Lesson 1 – Integrated Mosquito Management

  • Physical Control Methods
    • Drainage for Mosquito Control
    • Filling for Mosquito Control
    • Water Management
  • Biological Controls
    • Mosquito Pathogens
    • Mosquito Growth Regulators
    • Mosquito Parasites
    • Mosquito Predators
    • Sterilization in Mosquito Control
  • Molecular Mosquito Control

Lesson 2 – Insecticides

  • Insecticides for Mosquito Control
  • Safety Re-cap
    • LD50 & LC50
    • Signal Words
  • Insecticide Exposure Effects
    • Antidotes
    • Exposure Symptoms
  • First Aid
    • Dermal Exposure
    • Ocular Exposure
    • Inhalation Exposure
    • Ingestion Exposure
  • Insecticides for Mosquito Control

Lesson 3 – Larval Control Products

  • Larval Mosquito Control
  • Pre-Application Considerations
  • Choosing a Formulation
  • Basic List of Larvicides
    • Microbial Larvicides
    • Juvenile Growth Hormones
    • Organophosphate Larvicides
    • Monomolecular Films
    • Larvicide Oils

Lesson 4 – Adult Mosquito Control Products

  • Adulticides
    • Fog and Mist Applications
    • Adulticiding Considerations
    • Insecticides for Adult Control
  • Pesticides
    • Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids
    • Organophosphates
      • Malathion
      • Chlorpyrifos
      • Naled

Lesson 5 – Equipment for Mosquito Control Applications

  • Equipment Overview
    • Larviciding Equipment
    • Adulticiding Equipment
    • Ultra Low Volume
    • GPS/GIS Mapping

Lesson 6 – Program Evaluation

  • Evaluation and IPM
  • Insecticide Evaluation
    • Evaluating Mosquito Control Insecticides
    • Evaluation Procedures/Sampling
    • Evaluating Adulticide Application
    • Sampling Station Network
    • Sampling & Application Map
    • Evaluating New Formulations
      • Abbott’s Formula
      • Mulla’s Formula
    • Larvicide Pool Sampling
    • Evaluating Emergency Inhibitor Larvicides
      • E.I. Calculation
    • Non-Target Effects Studies
    • Resistance Management

Final Assessment 


Pesticides in the Environment 

Course Description

Applicators and the public share concerns about how pesticides may harm the environment. Initially, hazards to humans were the primary reason the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) decided to classify a pesticide as a restricted-use product. Now, more and more pesticide labels list environmental effects (such as contamination of groundwater or toxicity to birds or aquatic organisms) as reasons for restriction. Anyone who uses a pesticide—indoors or outdoors, in a city or on a farm—must consider how that pesticide affects the environment.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Describe how pesticide applications can affect the environment.
  • Explain how to prevent pesticide drift, runoff, and movement to nontarget areas.
  • Discuss how to prevent pesticide residue accumulation associated with mixing, loading, and equipment washing.

Chapter 1 – Pesticides in the Environment

Lesson 1

  • The Environment
  • Pesticide Characteristics
  • How Pesticides Move in the Environment
  • Preventing Pesticide Drift

Lesson 2 

  • Sources of Water Contamination
  • Preventing Surface Water and Groundwater Contamination
  • Preventing Harmful Effects on Sensitive Areas and
  • Nontarget Organisms
  • Protecting Endangered Species

Final Assessment


Pesticide Formulations

Course Description

A pesticide formulation is a combination of active and inert ingredients that form an end-use pesticide product. Pesticides are formulated to make them safer or easier to use. There are many formulations available for various pest control sites and situations, and it is important that applicators choose the best one for the job.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Explain why pesticides are formulated for end use.
  • List the factors to consider when choosing a formulation for a specific site or situation.
  • Discuss the properties of common formulations.

Chapter 1 – Pesticide Formulations

Lesson 1 

  • Formulations: An Overview
  • Liquid Formulations

Lesson 2

  • Dry or Solid Formulations
  • Other Formulations
  • Pesticide Mixtures
  • Adjuvants

Final Assessment


Pesticide Hazards and First Aid

Course Description

Pesticides are designed to be toxic to living organisms so they can control pests (e.g., plants, insects, rodents,
fungi, and bacteria). At the same time, pesticides must be used with special care to avoid harming nontarget organisms, including pesticide applicators, handlers, and anyone else exposed to the product. Pesticides can have both short-term
and long-term effects on humans. As a result, pesticide users need to be concerned with the hazards associated
with exposure to the chemical and not exclusively with the toxicity of the pesticide.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify common exposure routes for various pesticides and application methods.
  • Discuss the appropriate first aid response to oral, ocular, dermal, and inhalation exposures to pesticides.
  • Explain the hazard level classification system for pesticides, including the corresponding signal words.

Chapter 1 – Pesticide Hazards and First Aid

Lesson 1 

  • Toxicity, Exposure, and Hazard
  • Potential Harmful Effects of Pesticides
  • Exposure—How Pesticides Enter the Body
  • Product Toxicity and Health Concerns

Lesson 2 

  • Factors Affecting Response
  • Signal Words
  • Exposure Symptom Recognition
  • Antidotes
  • First Aid for Pesticide Poisoning

Final Assessment 


Pest Management

Course Description

Civilization has been combating insects and other pests throughout history. A pest is an undesirable organism that injures
humans, desirable plants and animals, manufactured products, or natural substances. Many insects, pathogens (disease-causing organisms, such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi), plants (known as weeds), mollusks (slugs and snails), fish, birds, and a variety of mammals (from mice to deer) compete for our crops and livestock. As the battle between humans
and pests continues over time, so will innovative methods of control.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the importance of pest identification in pest control.
  • Describe how pest population levels trigger control procedures.
  • Give several reasons why pesticide applications may fail.

Chapter 1 – Pest Management

Lesson 1

  • Pest Control Over the Years
  • Pest Categories
  • Pest Identification
  • Controls

Lesson 2

  • How Pesticides Work
  • Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
  • Effectiveness of Pest Management Programs

Final Assessment 


Planning the Pesticide Application 

Course Description

Planning is essential before beginning a pesticide application. To help plan, you should know how to select the right pesticide for the job, review the label, test for pesticide compatibility before mixing, choose what personal protective equipment to wear, transfer pesticides safely, and how to clean up after an application. Careful planning and consideration of all details is the hallmark of professionalism.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Explain how to select appropriate pesticides and additives (if needed).
  • Follow the label for safe mixing and loading.
  • State some basic procedures that ensure the correct application of pesticides.

Chapter 1 – Planning the Pesticide Application

Lesson 1

  • Selecting the pesticide
  • Reviewing the pesticide label
  • Determining pesticide compatibility

Lesson 2 

  • Following safe mixing and loading practices
  • Cleaning and disposing of pesticide containers
  • Applying pesticides correctly/PPE
  • Cleaning up after mixing, loading, and application

Final Assessment 


Personal Protective Equipment and Emergency Response

Course Description

PPE comprises the clothing and devices you wear to protect your body from contact with pesticides. Wearing PPE can reduce exposure (dermal, inhalation, ocular, or oral) and thereby lower the chances of pesticide injury, illness, or poisoning. It is important that all pesticide applicators and handlers understand the protections and limitations of PPE. Proper PPE selection, use, and care are essential.

Although pesticide accidents and emergencies are rare, they do occur. Pesticides spilled on the ground or burning in a fire can contaminate water, soil, and air; damage plants; injure livestock, wildlife, or pets; and endanger the health of the applicator and emergency responders. Pesticide spills and fires may lead to financial loss due to cleanup, liability claims, and fines assessed by government agencies. Do all that you can to prevent accidents, but be prepared in case of emergency.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify where on the label to find the minimum clothing and personal protective equipment (PPE) required to handle a given pesticide product.
  • State the criteria to properly select skin, eye, and respiratory protection required by the pesticide label based upon your expected use and exposure.
  • Discuss how pesticide releases from spills and fires can endanger humans and the environment.
  • Explain how to execute an emergency response plan.

Chapter 1 – Personal Protective Equipment

Lesson 1

  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Good Work Practices
  • Protect Yourself from Pesticides
  • Protect Your Body
  • Protect Your Eyes

Lesson 2 

  • Protect Your Respiratory System
  • Maintaining Clothing and Personal Protective Equipment

Chapter 2 – Emergency Response

Lesson 1 

  • Emergency Response Planning
  • Fires
  • Pesticide Spills

Final Assessment


Transportation, Storage, Security, and Professional Conduct

Course Description

This course discusses safety and security issues that may arise when pesticides are moved or stored. Serious accidents involving pesticides are more likely to occur while they are in transit. Securing pesticides in a vehicle or in storage is a critical step to prevent vandalism or theft of product. You can reduce pesticide transport and storage problems by being aware of the conditions that lead to increased security risks.

It is important for certified applicators to know under what conditions uncertified people can make applications of restricted use products. You also need to understand the importance of communication and how to communicate with customers about what you are doing.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • State what precautions to take before transporting pesticides.
  • Summarize what the label says about legally disposing of unwanted pesticides.
  • List the steps to take to restrict access to pesticides.
  • Explain the basics of professionalism for pesticide applicators.

Chapter 1 – Transportation, Storage, and Security

Lesson 1 

  • Transportation
  • Storage of Pesticides in Buildings
  • Pesticide Site Security

Lesson 2 

  • Best Practices
  • Disposal and Recycling

Chapter 2 – Professional Conduct 

Lesson 1 

  • Pesticide Security and Supervision
  • Public and Customer Communications

Final Assessment 


Application Equipment and Calibration

Course Description

When pesticide applications become necessary for good turf management, it’s important to understand how application equipment works and how to properly calibrate the equipment. An accurate measurement of the area to be treated and properly calibrated equipment are critical to applying pesticides within an acceptable range of the label requirements. This course will discuss the most common types of equipment used for pesticide applications on turf, the way to calculate the area of an irregularly shaped space, and how to properly calculate the flow rate of the equipment.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Describe the different types of equipment used in pesticide applications
  • Accurately calculate the square footage of irregular areas
  • Accurately calibrate common application equipment

Chapter 1 – Application Equipment

Lesson 1

  • Spray Output Equipment
  • Applying Pesticides
  • Application Techniques

Chapter 2 – Calibration

Lesson 1

  • Application Calculations
    • Divide and Calculate
    • Offset Line Method

Lesson 2 

  • When to Calibrate
  • Liquid Spray Equipment
  • Calibrating Small Sprayers
  • Calibrating Showerhead Sprayers
  • Calibrating Spray Equipment

Lesson 3

  • Ounce-to-Gallon Method
  • Granular Equipment
  • Calibration Steps

Final Assessment


Course instructors will be available by email or telephone between 9am and 5pm Eastern Standard Time. They will assist you with questions regarding course content.

If you have any questions, please call us at 1-800-727-7104 or send an email to info@onlinecti.com. Email responses will usually be returned promptly, but guaranteed within one business day.

Student policies and procedures are always available by going to our website and scrolling to the bottom of the page (See Attendance and Privacy Policy).

 
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