Indiana Seed Treatment 10 CCH Bundle

This course bundle is designed for the Indiana Commercial Seed Treatment Applicator. The course bundle contains 10 continuing certification hours (CCHs) of training approved by the Indiana Office of the State Chemist. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

BUNDLE CONTENTS:

  • Seed Treatment Product Safety – 1 CCH
  • Reading the Pesticide Label: Beyond the Basics – 2 CCHs
  • Pesticide Labels and Safety Data Sheets – 1 CCH
  • Pesticide Labeling – 1 CCH
  • Environmental Fate and Transport of Pesticides – 1 CCH
  • Pesticide Hazards and First Aid – 1 CCH
  • Pest Management – 1 CCH
  • Planning the Pesticide Application – 1 CCH
  • Personal Protective Equipment and Emergency Response – 1 CCH

 


Seed Treatment Product Safety 

Course Description

In the last ten years, there has been a resurgence of treated seed use, largely due to the advent of improved chemical performance. We as agricultural producers are obviously concerned about the more modern applications of these processes, not only because they have been found to be beneficial to early crop protection but especially because they have been of concern to the safety of humans and the environment. This course will outline the benefits and risks associated with treated seed products.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Weigh the benefits of treated seed products against the concerns for both human and environmental safety.
  • Outline the different types of seed treatment methods, dressings, and manufacturing processes.
  • Be able to describe and integrate important safety guidelines based on EPA risk assessment recommendations.
  • Describe the environmental impact of seed treatment processes, and best practices as environmental stewards.

Reading the Pesticide Label: Beyond the Basics

Course Description

This training will cover many sections of a pesticide label and safety data sheets. Labels are increasing in complexity and depth of information. It is never suggested that anyone try to memorize a pesticide label. By reviewing parts of a label and recognizing label language and use, we hope that you feel more comfortable with the information on pesticide labels and feel confident in understanding the information the present. Many examples of labels are used in this training that cover a variety of types of pesticides and also represent a variety of sites. It’s essential that we look at REAL label language and not simply make generic statements to evaluate.

There is no endorsement for any company or product by representation of information in this training. All material presented is for educational purposes only and is not intended to purposefully include or exclude any company, tradename, product, use, proprietary, or any other information. Whenever you have questions about interpretations of label language, we encourage you to contact your local extension, land-grant university, department of agriculture, product dealer, or the manufacturer for more information.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss different types of pesticide registrations.
  • Identify where to find specific information on the pesticide label.
  • Identify pests and site usage according to the label, and recognize information on safety data sheets.

Pesticide Labels and Safety Data Sheets

Course Description

Pesticide labels and safety data sheets (SDS) appear to contain much of the same information. While the label is the law, an SDS is not considered the law. As an applicator, it is important to understand the difference between a pesticide label and a safety data sheet and know what information can be found in each document. This course will review the various parts of pesticide labels and safety data sheets to identify the similarities and differences.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the content and sections of a pesticide label
  • Identify the content and sections of a safety data sheet (SDS)
  • Outline the differences between information such as signal words and PPE on pesticide labels and safety data sheets
  • Explain how to use pesticide labels and safety data sheets to prepare applications

Pesticide Labeling

Course Description

The pesticide label is the main method of communication between a pesticide manufacturer and pesticide users. The information printed on and attached to the pesticide container is the label. By law, pesticide users are required to comply with all instructions and use directions found on the pesticide product label. Labeling includes the label itself plus all other
information about the product referenced on the label and given when you buy the product. Pesticide labeling includes instructions on how to use the product safely and correctly.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Interpret the meaning of label signal words, symbols, and their relative hazard levels.
  • Accurately identify the common, chemical, and brand or trade name of a pesticide.
  • Describe how to interpret other documents and online resources referenced on the label.

Environmental Fate and Transport of Pesticides

Course Description

Pesticides are a key factor in pest management but it is important to understand what happens to those pesticides after the application. This course will review some key characteristics of environmental factors that can affect how pesticides move and degrade in the environment.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Describe the elements of the environment that can play a role in chemical processing such as soil composition and moisture
  • Describe the role of microbes and the factors that change populations
  • Identify the factors that affect pesticide drift
  • Explain the ways that pesticides can be decomposed
  • Identify the connections between pesticide properties and potential for groundwater contamination
  • Explain application techniques that can minimize impacts

Pesticide Hazards and First Aid

Course Description

Pesticides are designed to be toxic to living organisms so they can control pests (e.g., plants, insects, rodents,
fungi, and bacteria). At the same time, pesticides must be used with special care to avoid harming nontarget organisms, including pesticide applicators, handlers, and anyone else exposed to the product. Pesticides can have both short-term
and long-term effects on humans. As a result, pesticide users need to be concerned with the hazards associated
with exposure to the chemical and not exclusively with the toxicity of the pesticide.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify common exposure routes for various pesticides and application methods.
  • Discuss the appropriate first aid response to oral, ocular, dermal, and inhalation exposures to pesticides.
  • Explain the hazard level classification system for pesticides, including the corresponding signal words.

Pest Management

Course Description

Civilization has been combating insects and other pests throughout history. A pest is an undesirable organism that injures
humans, desirable plants and animals, manufactured products, or natural substances. Many insects, pathogens (disease-causing organisms, such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi), plants (known as weeds), mollusks (slugs and snails), fish, birds, and a variety of mammals (from mice to deer) compete for our crops and livestock. As the battle between humans
and pests continues over time, so will innovative methods of control.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the importance of pest identification in pest control.
  • Describe how pest population levels trigger control procedures.
  • Give several reasons why pesticide applications may fail.

Planning the Pesticide Application 

Course Description

Planning is essential before beginning a pesticide application. To help plan, you should know how to select the right pesticide for the job, review the label, test for pesticide compatibility before mixing, choose what personal protective equipment to wear, transfer pesticides safely, and how to clean up after an application. Careful planning and consideration of all details is the hallmark of professionalism.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Explain how to select appropriate pesticides and additives (if needed).
  • Follow the label for safe mixing and loading.
  • State some basic procedures that ensure the correct application of pesticides.

Personal Protective Equipment and Emergency Response

Course Description

PPE comprises the clothing and devices you wear to protect your body from contact with pesticides. Wearing PPE can reduce exposure (dermal, inhalation, ocular, or oral) and thereby lower the chances of pesticide injury, illness, or poisoning. It is important that all pesticide applicators and handlers understand the protections and limitations of PPE. Proper PPE selection, use, and care are essential.

Although pesticide accidents and emergencies are rare, they do occur. Pesticides spilled on the ground or burning in a fire can contaminate water, soil, and air; damage plants; injure livestock, wildlife, or pets; and endanger the health of the applicator and emergency responders. Pesticide spills and fires may lead to financial loss due to cleanup, liability claims, and fines assessed by government agencies. Do all that you can to prevent accidents, but be prepared in case of an emergency.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify where on the label to find the minimum clothing and personal protective equipment (PPE) required to handle a given pesticide product.
  • State the criteria to properly select skin, eye, and respiratory protection required by the pesticide label based upon your expected use and exposure.
  • Discuss how pesticide releases from spills and fires can endanger humans and the environment.
  • Explain how to execute an emergency response plan.

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