Indiana Structural Pest Control 20 CCH Bundle

This course bundle is designed for the Indiana Commercial Structural Pest Control Applicator. The course bundle contains 20 continuing certification hours (CCHs) of training approved by the Indiana Office of the State Chemist. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

BUNDLE CONTENTS:

  • Vertebrate Structural Pest Control – 3 CCHs
  • Cage Trapping Techniques – 3 CCHs
  • Intro to Mosquito Control – 2 CCHs
  • Zika and Other Mosquito-Borne Diseases – 1 CCH
  • Bed Bugs: Overview and Management – 2 CCH
  • Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Health – 1 CCH
  • Pollinator Stewardship – 1 CCH
  • Reading the Pesticide Label: Beyond the Basics – 2 CCHs
  • Pesticides in the Environment – 1 CCH
  • Pesticide Formulations – 1 CCH
  • Pesticide Hazards and First Aid – 1 CCH
  • Pesticide Labeling – 1 CCH
  • Personal Protective Equipment and Emergency Response – 1 CCH

 


Vertebrate Structural Pest Control and ID

Course Description

Wildlife damage inspection is a complex area. The information that follows is designed to focus ONLY on the fundamentals. This is not a book about running your business. It is a technical guide to educate readers about the process and interpretation of sign left by vertebrate animals in human-impacted environments. More information could have been added but would have cluttered the text with minutia only useful in extremely marginal situations.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Become confident in the identification of various vertebrate species based on habitat, routes of entry, scat and track information.
  • Understand and evaluate the physical, biological and legal risks involved in the inspection process.
  • Outline the different types equipment and PPE used in the inspection industry.

Cage Trapping Techniques

Course Description

Cage and box traps play an important role in the management of vertebrate pests in urban and suburban environments. These devices capture animals by imprisoning them in a wire cage or box with solid walls. Their simple construction and perceived humaneness lead many to mistakenly believe that these devices require little training to master. This course will review the differences amongst cage and box traps and how to use those differences to achieve control goals. Likewise, students will learn the three main trapping sets, effective baits, safe and humane use of the traps, and how to reduce non-target captures. After this class, you will never see cage/box trapping in the same way again.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the parts of cage and box traps.
  • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of different features in cage/box traps and how retail traps differ from commercial traps.
  • Know foundational ways to use cage/box traps to improve capture efficacy and improve humaneness.
  • Understand the importance of disease safety for both the wildlife control operator and the client.

Intro to Mosquito Control

Course Description

Mankind has been battling mosquitoes since before the first settlers landed on the continent. Mosquitoes are vectors for a multitude of diseases that are harmful to humans, livestock, and pets. To effectively manage a mosquito population as part of an integrated pest management plan applicators must be familiar with mosquito physiology, the lifecycle of the mosquito, and various collection and surveillance methods for both adult mosquitoes and larvae. It is also important to have a good understanding of the diseases that are commonly vectored by mosquitoes. The course will talk about surveillance methods, mosquito anatomy, and touch on the diseases that are most commonly vectored by mosquitoes in the United States.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Describe the different stages in the mosquito lifecycle.
  • Explain the differences between male and female mosquitoes.
  • Suggest different surveillance and collection tactics to efficiently trap mosquitoes in the target area.
  • List and describe several commonly mosquito vectored diseases.

Zika and Other Mosquito-Borne Diseases

Course Description

This course brings to light an up-and-coming issue within the United States and an issue that has been on-going across the world. Many mosquito-borne diseases are specified within the course, with an emphasis on the Zika Virus. Zika’s extent, side effects, testing and diagnostics are detailed along with protection and reduction techniques of mosquitoes to minimize the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases.

After completing this course participants will thoroughly understand:

  • Implement methods to reduce mosquito populations.
  • The zika virus, how it is contracted, what effect it has on the human body, testing and diagnostics, and what the congress is doing to aid in its prevention.
  • What can be done to prevent and control mosquitoes personally and from the source.

Bed Bugs: Overview and Management

Course Description

Most people visibly cringe when they hear the words “bed bugs”. Structural applicators know that managing a bed bug infestation is difficult on many levels. This course looks at the history of bed bugs, current integrated pest management approaches to preventing and managing an infestation, and several of the chemical options available when your non-chemical controls and methods have failed.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Speak confidently to clients and residents concerning chemical and non-chemical controls.
  • Accurately differentiate between bed bugs and bat bugs.
  • Positively identify the signs of a bed bug infestation.

Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Health

Course Description

Balancing the need to manage agricultural pests with pollinator health is dependent on cooperation between beekeepers, farmers and pesticide applicators. This course outlines the importance of honey bees honey bee decline, and discusses some pollinator myths. Finally, the strategies required to coordinate the efforts of farmers, beekeepers and applicators is discussed.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Gain an understanding of the issues surrounding pollinator importance, decline and health.
  • Tailor a management strategy that addresses the cooperation between farmers, beekeepers, and applicators.

Pollinator Stewardship

Course Description

Honey Bee Stewardship. The primary concern plaguing the bee keeping industry is the decline of honey bees around the world. Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is the leading cause behind this steady decline in honey bee numbers. There are a number of different factors affecting this decline. This course provides an outline of the best practices concerning honey bee stewardship.

Minimizing Pesticide Risk for Pollinators. Whether applying pesticides in the home garden or in a commercial setting, many of the chemical pesticides used to control insects, fungal disease, and even weeds can hurt non-target pollinating insects, such as bees and butterflies. This section will ensure your ability to affectively and efficiently apply pesticides without harming beneficial insects.

Participants in this course will be able to:

  • Gain an understanding of the factors that contribute to colony collapse disorder.
  • Recognize the importance of beekeeper/grower communication.
  • The importance of pollinators in agriculture and why protecting native pollinators is of great concern.
  • The federal and state enforcement and compliance procedure as related to pollinator safety and alternatives to hard chemicals.

Reading the Pesticide Label: Beyond the Basics

Course Description

This training will cover many sections of a pesticide label and safety data sheets. Labels are increasing in complexity and depth of information. It is never suggested that anyone try to memorize a pesticide label. By reviewing parts of a label and recognizing label language and use, we hope that you feel more comfortable with the information on pesticide labels and feel confident in understanding the information the present. Many examples of labels are used in this training that cover a variety of types of pesticides and also represent a variety of sites. It’s essential that we look at REAL label language and not simply make generic statements to evaluate.

There is no endorsement for any company or product by representation of information in this training. All material presented is for educational purposes only and is not intended to purposefully include or exclude any company, tradename, product, use, proprietary, or any other information. Whenever you have questions about interpretations of label language, we encourage you to contact your local extension, land-grant university, department of agriculture, product dealer, or the manufacturer for more information.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss different types of pesticide registrations.
  • Identify where to find specific information on the pesticide label.
  • Identify pests and site usage according to the label, and recognize information on safety data sheets.

Pesticides in the Environment

Course Description

Applicators and the public share concerns about how pesticides may harm the environment. Initially, hazards to humans were the primary reason the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) decided to classify a pesticide as a restricted-use product. Now, more and more pesticide labels list environmental effects (such as contamination of groundwater or toxicity to birds or aquatic organisms) as reasons for restriction. Anyone who uses a pesticide—indoors or outdoors, in a city or on a farm—must consider how that pesticide affects the environment.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Describe how pesticide applications can affect the environment.
  • Explain how to prevent pesticide drift, runoff, and movement to nontarget areas.
  • Discuss how to prevent pesticide residue accumulation associated with mixing, loading, and equipment washing.

Pesticide Formulations

Course Description

A pesticide formulation is a combination of active and inert ingredients that forms an end-use pesticide product. Pesticides are formulated to make them safer or easier to use. There are many formulations available for various pest control sites and situations, and it is important that applicators choose the best one for the job.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Explain why pesticides are formulated for end use.
  • List the factors to consider when choosing a formulation for a specific site or situation.
  • Discuss the properties of common formulations.

Pesticide Hazards and First Aid

Course Description

Pesticides are designed to be toxic to living organisms so they can control pests (e.g., plants, insects, rodents,
fungi, and bacteria). At the same time, pesticides must be used with special care to avoid harming nontarget organisms, including pesticide applicators, handlers, and anyone else exposed to the product. Pesticides can have both short-term
and long-term effects on humans. As a result, pesticide users need to be concerned with the hazards associated
with exposure to the chemical and not exclusively with the toxicity of the pesticide.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify common exposure routes for various pesticides and application methods.
  • Discuss the appropriate first aid response to oral, ocular, dermal, and inhalation exposures to pesticides.
  • Explain the hazard level classification system for pesticides, including the corresponding signal words.

Pesticide Labeling

Course Description

The pesticide label is the main method of communication between a pesticide manufacturer and pesticide users. The information printed on and attached to the pesticide container is the label. By law, pesticide users are required to comply with all instructions and use directions found on the pesticide product label. Labeling includes the label itself plus all other
information about the product referenced on the label and given when you buy the product. Pesticide labeling includes instructions on how to use the product safely and correctly.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Interpret the meaning of label signal words, symbols, and their relative hazard levels.
  • Accurately identify the common, chemical, and brand or trade name of a pesticide.
  • Describe how to interpret other documents and online resources referenced on the label.

Personal Protective Equipment and Emergency Response

Course Description

PPE comprises the clothing and devices you wear to protect your body from contact with pesticides. Wearing PPE can reduce exposure (dermal, inhalation, ocular, or oral) and thereby lower the chances of pesticide injury, illness, or poisoning. It is important that all pesticide applicators and handlers understand the protections and limitations of PPE. Proper PPE
selection, use, and care are essential.

Although pesticide accidents and emergencies are rare, they do occur. Pesticides spilled on the ground or burning in a fire can contaminate water, soil, and air; damage plants; injure livestock, wildlife, or pets; and endanger the health of the applicator and emergency responders. Pesticide spills and fires may lead to financial loss due to cleanup, liability claims, and fines assessed by government agencies. Do all that you can to prevent accidents, but be prepared in case of emergency.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify where on the label to find the minimum clothing and personal protective equipment (PPE) required to handle a given pesticide product.
  • State the criteria to properly select skin, eye, and respiratory protection required by the pesticide label based upon your expected use and exposure.
  • Discuss how pesticide releases from spills and fires can endanger humans and the environment.
  • Explain how to execute an emergency response plan.

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If you have any questions, please call us at 1-800-727-7104 or send an email to info@onlinecti.com. Email responses will usually be returned promptly, but guaranteed within one business day.

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