Nevada Principal Applicator 6 Credit Bundle – Agricultural

$99.00

Online HD Video | Principal Applicators, Operators, Consultants, and Demo & Research Specialists
This course bundle is designed for the Nevada Principle Applicator. The course bundle contains 6 credits of continuing education Nevada Department of Agriculture approved courses with an emphasis on agricultural pest management including one hour of laws and regulations. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

Categories: ,

Description

This course bundle is designed for the Nevada Principle Applicator. The course bundle contains 6 credits of continuing education Nevada Department of Agriculture approved courses with an emphasis on agricultural pest management including one hour of laws and regulations. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

BUNDLE CONTENTS

Laws and Regulations Course

  • Transportation, Storage, Security, and Professional Development – 1 credit

Agricultural Pest Management Courses

  • Pest Identification: Corn, Soybean, and Grain Sorghum – 2 credits
  • Pest Identification: Rice, Cotton, and Peanut – 1 credit
  • Seed Treatment Product Safety – 1 credit
  • Pollinator Stewardship – 1 credit

 


Transportation, Storage, Security, and Professional Conduct

Course Description

This course discusses safety and security issues that may arise when pesticides are moved or stored. Serious accidents involving pesticides are more likely to occur while they are in transit. Securing pesticides in a vehicle or in storage is a critical step to prevent vandalism or theft of product. You can reduce pesticide transport and storage problems by being aware of the conditions that lead to increased security risks.

It is important for certified applicators to know under what conditions uncertified people can make applications of restricted use products. You also need to understand the importance of communication and how to communicate with customers about what you are doing.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • State what precautions to take before transporting pesticides.
  • Summarize what the label says about legally disposing of unwanted pesticides.
  • List the steps to take to restrict access to pesticides.
  • Explain the basics of professionalism for pesticide applicators.

Chapter 1 – Transportation, Storage, and Security

Lesson 1 

  • Transportation
  • Storage of Pesticides in Buildings
  • Pesticide Site Security

Lesson 2 

  • Best Practices
  • Disposal and Recycling

Chapter 2 – Professional Conduct 

Lesson 1 

  • Pesticide Security and Supervision
  • Public and Customer Communications

Final Assessment 


Pest Identification: Corn, Soybean, and Grain Sorghum

Course Description

Corn Insect Pests. This course goes over in detail the many insects that threaten corn yield. Each species is identified according to various stages of maturity, the signs and symptoms exhibited, and the type of biological, cultural or chemical control recommended for each.

Soybean Insect Pests. This course details the various types of insects that affect soybeans, including early-season insect pests, stem and petiole feeders, and defoliators. Treatment and control strategies for specified insects within these groups are detailed throughout this lesson.

Grain Sorghum Insect Pests. Sorghum represents a large portion of the U.S. export industry. It is a versatile crop that is used as a grain, forage or sweet crop. It is subject to infestation by a variety of insect pests. Good production practices can help reduce infestation when sampled regularly from emergence to maturity. This course will outline how to manage for these pests in a timely and efficient way.

Course attendants will learn specifics on:

  • The major pests currently affecting corn crops in the United States today.
  • How to develop strategies to manage and control corn insect pests.
  • Early season insect pests: how to recognize, control and prevent
  • Multiple soybean fruit and pod feeders, the extent of damage each causes, and prevention techniques
  • Identify the different groups of grain sorghum pests and which insects within those groups are most harmful.
  • Identify the vegetative and grain-filling stages of plant growth.

Chapter 1 – Corn Insect Pests 

Lesson 1 – Threshold, Biological, Cultural, Chemical Control, and Host Plant Resistance of:

  • Southwestern Corn Borer
  • Southern, Northern, and Western Rootworm
  • Cutworm
  • Fall Armyworm
  • Corn Earworm

Chapter 2 – Soybean Insect Pests 

Lesson 1 – Soybean Insect Identification and Management

  • Early-Season Insect Pests
    • Soil Insect Pests
    • Seed Treatments
    • Soybean Behind Cover Crops
  • Stem and Petiole Feeders
    • Three-cornered Alfalfa Hopper
    • Kudzu Bug
  • Defoliators
    • Grasshoppers
    • Blister Beetles
    • Bean Leaf Beetles
    • Green Cloverworm
    • Soybean Looper
    • Velvetbean Caterpillar
    • Saltmarsh Caterpillar
    • Beet Armyworm
    • Fall Armyworm

Chapter 3 – Grain Sorghum Insect Pests 

Lesson 1 – Grain Sorghum Pests and Management

  • Five Vegetable Stages and Four Grain-Filling Stages of Sorghum
  • Soil Pests
  • Seedling Pests
  • Leaf and Stalk-Boring Pests
  • Panicle and Seed Pests
  • Sugarcane Aphid
  • Sorghum Midge
  • Fall Armyworm
  • Corn Earworm
  • Sorghum Webworm

Final Assessment 


Pest Identification: Rice, Cotton, and Peanuts

Course Description

Rice Insect Pests. This section details the major and the minor pests commonly associated with rice crops. These include weevils, stink bugs, armyworms, aphids, borers, midges and more. Students will learn to identify insects at various stages of maturity and to recognize specific insects based on the damage done to the crop.

Cotton Insect Pest and Management Strategies. This section will demonstrate how to identify insect pests in cotton, and outline the most common management strategies. Major insect pests in cotton include thrips, plant bugs, stink bugs, bollworm, budworm, beet armyworm, fall armyworm, spider mites, and others.

Peanut Insect Pests.  This section will cover the major pests commonly associated with peanut crops. These include thrips, cutworms, lesser cornstalk borer, threecornered alfalfa hopper, rednecked peanutworm, peanut burrower bug, and several defoliators.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Outline the most common insect pests of rice, the damage they cause, and prevention methods for each.
  • Describe the impact these pests have on the yield and quality of rice grain.
  • Identify various insect pests typically found in cotton.
  • Develop management strategies to control these pests.
  • Discuss the most common insect pests of peanuts, the damage they cause, and prevention methods for each.

Chapter 1 – Rice Insect Pests 

Lesson 1

  • Major Insect Pests of Rice
    • Grape Colaspis (Lespedeza Worm)
    • Rice Water Weevil
    • Rice Stink Bug
  • Minor Insect Pests of Rice
    • Stem Borers
    • Billbug
    • Grasshoppers
    • Fall Armyworm and True Armyworm
    • Chinch Bug
    • Aphids
    • Rice Seed Midges

Chapter 2 – Cotton Insect Pest and Management Strategies 

Lesson 1

  • Major Insect Pests of Cotton
    • Thrips
    • Tarnished Plant Bug
    • Clouded Plant Bug
    • Stink Bugs
    • Bollworms
    • Tobacco Budworm
    • Beet Armyworm
    • Fall Armyworm
    • Spider Mites
  • Minor Insect Pests of Cotton
    • Loopers
    • Cutworms
    • Cotton Aphids
    • Cotton Fleahopper
    • Saltmarsh Caterpillar
    • Whiteflies

Chapter 3 – Peanut Insect Pests 

Lesson 1

  • Major Insect Pests of Peanut
    • Thrips
    • Cutworms
    • Lesser Cornstalk Borer
    • Threecornered Alfalfa Hopper
    • Defoliators
      • Corn Earworm
      • Tobacco budworm
      • Armyworms (fall, beet)
      • Veletbean caterpillar
      • Loopers (cabbage, soybean)
    • Rednecked Peanutworm
    • Peanut Burrower Bug

Final Assessment 


Seed Treatment Product Safety 

Course Description

In the last ten years there has been a resurgence of treated seed use, largely due to the advent of improved chemical performance. We as agricultural producers are obviously concerned about the more modern applications of these processes, not only because they have been found to be beneficial to early crop protection but especially because they have been of concern to the safety of humans and the environment. This course will outline the benefits and risks associated with treated seed products.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Weigh the benefits of treated seed products against the concerns for both human and environmental safety.
  • Outline the different types of seed treatment methods, dressings and manufacturing processes.
  • Be able to describe and integrate important safety guidelines based on EPA risk assessment recommendations.
  • Describe the environmental impact of seed treatment processes, and best practices as environmental stewards.

Chapter 1

Lesson 1

Global Considerations

  • Markets at a glance
  • Use trends

Safety Perspective—Asking the Right Questions

  • Risk to benefit
  • Potential health risks
  • Chemical exposure pathways

Safety Perspective—Where to find the right answers

  • Product label
  • Safety data sheet

Seed Treatment Methods

Safety Guidelines

  • Manufacturing
    • Engineering controls
    • Work practices
    • Personal hygiene
    • Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Lesson 2

Safety Guidelines – Cont.

  • Handling
  • Storage
  • Transport
  • Use
  • Disposal

Environmental Impacts and Stewardship

  • Pollinator myths exposed
  • Best management practices
  • Environmental impacts on other non-target organisms
  • Environmental impacts

Additional Resources

  • Seed treatment operator safety guidelines
  • Seed treatment and safety regulations

Final Assessment


Pollinator Stewardship

Course Description

Honey Bee Stewardship. The primary concern plaguing the beekeeping industry is the decline of honey bees around the world. Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is the leading cause behind this steady decline in honey bee numbers. There are a number of different factors affecting this decline. This course provides an outline of the best practices concerning honeybee stewardship.

Minimizing Pesticide Risk for Pollinators. Whether applying pesticides in the home garden or in a commercial setting, many of the chemical pesticides used to control insects, fungal disease, and even weeds can hurt non-target pollinating insects, such as bees and butterflies. This section will ensure your ability to effectively and efficiently apply pesticides without harming beneficial insects.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the factors that contribute to colony collapse disorder.
  • Recognize the importance of beekeeper/grower communication.
  • Describe the importance of pollinators in agriculture and why protecting native pollinators is of great concern.
  • Outline the federal and state enforcement and compliance procedure as related to pollinator safety and alternatives to hard chemicals.

Chapter 1 – Pollinator Stewardship 

Lesson 1

The Problem: Colony Collapse Disorder

  • Varroa mite
  • Viruses
  • Pesticide and drift
  • Agrochemical residues
  • Poor nutrition
  • Honey bee protection
  • Benefits of honey bees

Mississippi Pollinator Stewardship Program

  • Stakeholders
  • The best protection
  • Farmer-beekeeper partners
  • “Bee Aware” flag

Chapter 2 – Minimizing Pesticide Risk for Pollinators 

Lesson 1

  • Federal and state enforcement and compliance
  • Alternatives to hard chemicals
  • Organic-approved pesticides
  • Considerations when applying pesticides near beehives
  • Pesticide toxicity groups
  • Granular bait insecticide
  • Bait stations, pheromone lures, and sticky traps
  • Contact vs. systemic insecticides
  • Roadside habitat management

Final Assessment 


Course instructors will be available by email or telephone between 8am and 6pm Eastern Standard Time. They will assist you with questions regarding course content.

If you have any questions, please call us at 1-800-727-7104 or send an email to info@onlinecti.com. Email responses will usually be returned promptly, but guaranteed within one business day.

Student policies and procedures are always available by going to our website and scrolling to the bottom of the page (See Attendance & Privacy Policy).

 
291,483 Courses Taken
 
 
Your online 60-hour builders course is great. It is easy to navigate and the videos are awesome. I am learning so much about building and the industry. Thank you for putting this together.
Evan McDowellAugust, 2012.
 
Chat with us
Scroll Up