Oklahoma Agricultural Plant 10 CEU Recertification Bundle - Part 1

This course bundle is designed for the Oklahoma Commercial Applicator with an Agricultural Plant certificate (Category 1A). The course bundle contains 10 continuing education units (CEUs) of training approved by the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Applicators may complete a maximum of 10 CEUs per calendar year. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

BUNDLE CONTENTS:

  • Pest Identification: Corn, Soybean, and Grain Sorghum – 1 CEU
  • Pest Identification: Rice, Cotton, and Peanut – 1 CEU
  • IPM, Insect Sampling, and Calibration – 1 CEU
  • Pollinator Stewardship – 1 CEU
  • Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Health – 1 CEU
  • Environmental Fate and Transport of Pesticides – 1 CEU
  • Pesticide Labels and Safety Data Sheets – 1 CEU
  • Respiratory Protection – 1 CEU
  • Pest Management – 1 CEU
  • Pesticide Formulations – 1 CEU

 


Pest Identification: Corn, Soybean, and Grain Sorghum

Course Description

Corn Insect Pests. This course goes over in detail the many insects that threaten corn yield. Each species is identified according to various stages of maturity, the signs and symptoms exhibited, and the type of biological, cultural or chemical control recommended for each.

Soybean Insect Pests. This course details the various types of insects that affect soybeans, including early-season insect pests, stem and petiole feeders, and defoliators. Treatment and control strategies for specified insects within these groups are detailed throughout this lesson.

Grain Sorghum Insect Pests. Sorghum represents a large portion of the U.S. export industry. It is a versatile crop that is used as a grain, forage or sweet crop. It is subject to infestation by a variety of insect pests. Good production practices can help reduce infestation when sampled regularly from emergence to maturity. This course will outline how to manage for these pests in a timely and efficient way.

Course attendants will learn specifics on:

  • The major pests currently affecting corn crops in the United States today.
  • How to develop strategies to manage and control corn insect pests.
  • Early season insect pests: how to recognize, control and prevent
  • Multiple soybean fruit and pod feeders, the extent of damage each causes, and prevention techniques
  • Identify the different groups of grain sorghum pests and which insects within those groups are most harmful.
  • Identify the vegetative and grain-filling stages of plant growth.

Pest Identification: Rice, Cotton, and Peanuts

Course Description

Rice Insect Pests. This section details the major and the minor pests commonly associated with rice crops. These include weevils, stink bugs, armyworms, aphids, borers, midges and more. Students will learn to identify insects at various stages of maturity and to recognize specific insects based on the damage done to the crop.

Cotton Insect Pest and Management Strategies. This section will demonstrate how to identify insect pests in cotton, and outline the most common management strategies. Major insect pests in cotton include thrips, plant bugs, stink bugs, bollworm, budworm, beet armyworm, fall armyworm, spider mites, and others.

Peanut Insect Pests.  This section will cover the major pests commonly associated with peanut crops. These include thrips, cutworms, lesser cornstalk borer, threecornered alfalfa hopper, rednecked peanutworm, peanut burrower bug, and several defoliators.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Outline the most common insect pests of rice, the damage they cause, and prevention methods for each.
  • Describe the impact these pests have on the yield and quality of rice grain.
  • Identify various insect pests typically found in cotton.
  • Develop management strategies to control these pests.
  • Discuss the most common insect pests of peanuts, the damage they cause, and prevention methods for each.

Row Crop Basics: IPM, Insect Sampling, and Calibration

Course Description

Integrated Pest Management. Integrated Pest Management, or “IPM” for short, is an environmentally sound approach to controlling a pest population through common sense methods. Each control method will be addressed and defined in this presentation. IPM is a strategy focusing on the long-term prevention of pests or their damage through the use of multiple techniques.

Insect Sampling Techniques for Row Crops.  An important concern in agriculture management is minimizing insecticide use and controlling costs. The frequency of sampling is critical to making appropriate insect management decisions. These decisions should be made based on established treatment thresholds.

Pesticide Calibration. Calibration ensures that your equipment delivers the correct amount of pesticide uniformly across your field or target area and if done incorrectly or not at all has major consequences. It can mean the difference between control or failure of a pesticide. This course ensures you will be able to accurately calibrate using many types of application methods: broadcast application, banded application, multiple nozzles per row, and in-furrow applications.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Monitor and control pests through cultural, biological, mechanical, chemical, genetic, and host plant resistance methods.
  • Describe resistance, how it develops, and integrative ways it can be managed.
  • Describe the different of calibration types and why it is so important to calibrate before pesticide application occurs.
  • Become familiar with specific details and mathematical instructions on how to perform broadcast applications, banded applications, multiple nozzles per row, and in-furrow applications.

Pollinator Stewardship

Course Description

Honey Bee Stewardship. The primary concern plaguing the beekeeping industry is the decline of honey bees around the world. Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is the leading cause behind this steady decline in honey bee numbers. There are a number of different factors affecting this decline. This course provides an outline of the best practices concerning honeybee stewardship.

Minimizing Pesticide Risk for Pollinators. Whether applying pesticides in the home garden or in a commercial setting, many of the chemical pesticides used to control insects, fungal disease, and even weeds can hurt non-target pollinating insects, such as bees and butterflies. This section will ensure your ability to effectively and efficiently apply pesticides without harming beneficial insects.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the factors that contribute to colony collapse disorder.
  • Recognize the importance of beekeeper/grower communication.
  • Describe the importance of pollinators in agriculture and why protecting native pollinators is of great concern.
  • Outline the federal and state enforcement and compliance procedure as related to pollinator safety and alternatives to hard chemicals.

Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Health

Course Description

Balancing the need to manage agricultural pests with pollinator health is dependent on cooperation between beekeepers, farmers and pesticide applicators. This course outlines the importance of honey bees honey bee decline and discusses some pollinator myths. Finally, the strategies required to coordinate the efforts of farmers, beekeepers, and applicators are discussed.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Gain an understanding of the issues surrounding pollinator importance, decline, and health.
  • Tailor a management strategy that addresses the cooperation between farmers, beekeepers, and applicators.

Environmental Fate and Transport of Pesticides

Course Description

Pesticides are a key factor in pest management but it is important to understand what happens to those pesticides after the application. This course will review some key characteristics of environmental factors that can affect how pesticides move and degrade in the environment.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Describe the elements of the environment that can play a role in chemical processing such as soil composition and moisture
  • Describe the role of microbes and the factors that change populations
  • Identify the factors that affect pesticide drift
  • Explain the ways that pesticides can be decomposed
  • Identify the connections between pesticide properties and potential for groundwater contamination
  • Explain application techniques that can minimize impacts

Pesticide Labels and Safety Data Sheets

Course Description

Pesticide labels and safety data sheets (SDS) appear to contain much of the same information. While the label is the law, an SDS is not considered the law. As an applicator, it is important to understand the difference between a pesticide label and a safety data sheet and know what information can be found in each document. This course will review the various parts of pesticide labels and safety data sheets to identify the similarities and differences.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the content and sections of a pesticide label
  • Identify the content and sections of a safety data sheet (SDS)
  • Outline the differences between information such as signal words and PPE on pesticide labels and safety data sheets
  • Explain how to use pesticide labels and safety data sheets to prepare applications

Respiratory Protection

Course Description

Respirators protect workers against insufficient oxygen environments, harmful dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases, vapors, and sprays. These hazards may cause cancer, lung impairment, diseases, or death. Some pesticide labels require the use of a respirator as part of the personal protective equipment. This course outlines the types of respirators available, proper fit, and inspection/maintenance requirements.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the different types of respirators and when to use each type
  • Describe the steps of a successful fit test
  • Outline the necessary care and maintenance required for each type of respirator

Pest Management

Course Description

Civilization has been combating insects and other pests throughout history. A pest is an undesirable organism that injures
humans, desirable plants and animals, manufactured products, or natural substances. Many insects, pathogens (disease-causing organisms, such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi), plants (known as weeds), mollusks (slugs and snails), fish, birds, and a variety of mammals (from mice to deer) compete for our crops and livestock. As the battle between humans
and pests continues over time, so will innovative methods of control.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the importance of pest identification in pest control.
  • Describe how pest population levels trigger control procedures.
  • Give several reasons why pesticide applications may fail.

Pesticide Formulations

Course Description

A pesticide formulation is a combination of active and inert ingredients that form an end-use pesticide product. Pesticides are formulated to make them safer or easier to use. There are many formulations available for various pest control sites and situations, and it is important that applicators choose the best one for the job.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Explain why pesticides are formulated for end use.
  • List the factors to consider when choosing a formulation for a specific site or situation.
  • Discuss the properties of common formulations.

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