Oregon Commercial Applicator Bundle - Right-of-Way

This course bundle is designed for the Oregon commercial applicator. The bundle focuses on right-of-way pesticide use and safety. Commercial applicators may complete a maximum of 15 credits per calendar year. All courses are approved by the Oregon Department of Agriculture Pesticides Program. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

BUNDLE CONTENTS:

  • Right-of-Way: Pest Management Overview – 3 credits
  • Right-of-Way: Pest Control – 3 credits
  • Right-of-Way: Weed Control – 3 credits
  • Aquatic Weed Control – 1 credit
  • Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Health – 1 credit
  • Pollinator Stewardship – 1 credit
  • Pesticide Labels and Safety Data Sheets – 1 credit
  • Fungicides and Plant Pathogen Sampling – 1 credit
  • Calibration Clinic: Pesticide Sprayers and Spreaders – 1 credit

 


Right-of-Way: Pest Management Overview

Course Description

Pest management in right-of-way situations can be a challenge. The economic thresholds are different in right-of-way situations compared to either a landscape setting or an agricultural setting. The treatment areas can be more readily viewed by the public or may be too rough to reach using traditional equipment. While broadleaf and woody plant material is usually the major pests in right-of-way situations there can be insect and vertebrate pests that need management. This course provides an overview of pests common to rights-of-way, management solutions, a look at the equipment commonly used to treat rights-of-way, and a review of calibration steps for that equipment.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Outline the principles of an IPM program in right-of-way situations
  • Identify weeds and other pests commonly found in rights-of-way
  • Identify and calibrate equipment commonly used in right-of-way applications
  • Demonstrate an understanding of professional conduct and how to interact with the public

Right-of-Way: Pest Control

Course Description

This study guide was prepared from the Commercial Applicator Study Manual for Category 6, Right-of-Way Pest Control as published by the Mississippi State University Extension Service and approved by the Mississippi Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

• Identify five main groups of pests and the pests specific to each group
• Name the physical characteristics that aid in the identification of specific insects
• Identify the main cause of plant diseases
• Differentiate between the life cycles of annuals, biennials, and perennials
• Describe the developmental stages through which plants progress


Right-of-Way: Weed Control

Course Description

This course will review the methods and techniques to manage vegetation on rights of way and non-cropland industrial sites safely without damage to non-target species, sites, objects, or the environment

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Gain an understanding of the issues involved in controlling vegetation by roadways, utility lines, and pipelines.
  • Tailor a management strategy that addresses the unique needs of rights of way weed management.

Aquatic Weed Control

Course Description

Managing aquatic weeds revolves around proper plant identification. Proper control relies on proper identification. This course teaches the basics of aquatic weed identification and the different approaches to aquatic plant management.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Gain an understanding of the issues involved in controlling aquatic weeds.
  • Tailor a management strategy that addresses the unique identification and control approaches to aquatic plant life.

Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Health

Course Description

Balancing the need to manage agricultural pests with pollinator health is dependent on cooperation between beekeepers, farmers, and pesticide applicators. This course outlines the importance of honey bees honey bee decline and discusses some pollinator myths. Finally, the strategies required to coordinate the efforts of farmers, beekeepers, and applicators are discussed.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Gain an understanding of the issues surrounding pollinator importance, decline, and health.
  • Tailor a management strategy that addresses the cooperation between farmers, beekeepers, and applicators.

Pollinator Stewardship

Course Description

Honey Bee Stewardship. The primary concern plaguing the bee keeping industry is the decline of honey bees around the world. Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is the leading cause behind this steady decline in honey bee numbers. There are a number of different factors affecting this decline. This course provides an outline of the best practices concerning honeybee stewardship.

Minimizing Pesticide Risk for Pollinators. Whether applying pesticides in the home garden or in a commercial setting, many of the chemical pesticides used to control insects, fungal diseases, and even weeds can hurt non-target pollinating insects, such as bees and butterflies. This section will ensure your ability to effectively and efficiently apply pesticides without harming beneficial insects.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the factors that contribute to colony collapse disorder.
  • Recognize the importance of beekeeper/grower communication.
  • Describe the importance of pollinators in agriculture and why protecting native pollinators is of great concern.
  • Outline the federal and state enforcement and compliance procedure as related to pollinator safety and alternatives to hard chemicals.

Pesticide Labels and Safety Data Sheets

Course Description

Pesticide labels and safety data sheets (SDS) appear to contain much of the same information. While the label is the law, an SDS is not considered the law. As an applicator, it is important to understand the difference between a pesticide label and a safety data sheet and know what information can be found in each document. This course will review the various parts of pesticide labels and safety data sheets to identify the similarities and differences.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the content and sections of a pesticide label
  • Identify the content and sections of a safety data sheet (SDS)
  • Outline the differences between information such as signal words and PPE on pesticide labels and safety data sheets
  • Explain how to use pesticide labels and safety data sheets to prepare applications

Fungicides and Plant Pathogen Sampling

Course Description

This course provides the learner with a few basics necessary for effective management of turf and ornamentals. Understanding how to properly collect specimens for accurate analysis by a lab will save time and money. Understanding how a fungus infects a plant and which fungicide will treat that fungus effectively will provide quick treatment that can limit the damage done to the plant. Plant appearance, the status of the infections, what to include in your sample, and fungicide mechanism of action are discussed to provide a framework from which to formulate treatment strategies.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Gain an understanding of how fungicides penetrate the structures of a targeted plant.
  • Tailor a management strategy that addresses the prevention, identification, and treatment of fungal infections in plants.
  • Identify the proper part of the plant to send to the diagnostic lab for analysis.
  • Execute proper packaging and shipping of each sample to the diagnostic lab.

Calibration Clinic – Pesticide Sprayers and Spreaders

Course Description

Proper application of pesticides and fertilizers on turfgrass is only possible with accurately calibrated equipment. These lessons discuss the calibration of three types of application equipment: handheld or back-pack pump-up sprayers, large acreage sprayers, and fertilizer or “dry-granular” spreaders as well as several different calibration techniques.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Explain the strengths and weaknesses of the baby bottle and the 5940 calibration methods
  • Describe the steps to calibrate a boom sprayer
  • Describe the steps to calibrate a granular broadcast spreader

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