Oregon Private Applicator Bundle - Part B

This course bundle is designed for the Oregon private applicator. The bundle focuses on general pesticide use and safety and contains  three credits of core topics. All courses are approved by the Oregon Department of Agriculture Pesticides Program. Please click on course details for a list of specific courses.

BUNDLE CONTENTS:

  • Federal Pesticide Laws – 1 core credit
  • Pesticide Application Procedures – 1 core credit
  • Pest Identification: Corn, Soybean, and Grain Sorghum – 2 credits
  • Pollinator Stewardship – 1 core credit
  • Management of Pocket Gophers – 1 credit
  • Field Fumigation for Managing Vertebrate Pests – 2 credits

 


Federal Pesticide Laws

Course Description

Pesticides are hazardous substances that can cause serious harm if used improperly. Pesticides are regulated to utilize their benefits while protecting public health and welfare and preventing harm to the environment. Federal and state pesticide laws and regulations control the labeling, sale and distribution, storage, transportation, use, and disposal in the best public interest. This course addresses the requirements set forth by federal regulations. Pesticide applicators are responsible for learning about and complying with all regulations.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Be able to describe and integrate important regulatory requirements related to labeling, hazard management, environmental issues, and application procedures.
  • Distinguish between restricted-use and general-use pesticide classifications.
  • Explain the importance of maintaining accurate records of pesticide application and employee training.

Pesticide Application Procedures

Course Description

Today’s pest management practices require modern equipment to apply a variety of pesticides. Pesticides may be
applied as sprays, dusts, granules, gases (vapors), fogs, baits, rubs, or dips. The vast array of application equipment must
be matched to the pesticide as well as to the size and type of the job. To make an effective, safe, and efficient application,
read the label first. In addition, you must properly select, operate, calibrate, and maintain your equipment.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the factors (e.g., nozzles, volumes, pressures, and speeds) that affect calibration.
  • Demonstrate how to determine the amount of pesticide concentrate and diluent to use.
  • Explain how to choose appropriate drift reduction practices.

Pest Identification: Corn, Soybean, and Grain Sorghum

Course Description

Corn Insect Pests. This course goes over in detail the many insects that threaten corn yield. Each species is identified according to various stages of maturity, the signs and symptoms exhibited, and the type of biological, cultural or chemical control recommended for each.

Soybean Insect Pests. This course details the various types of insects that affect soybeans, including early-season insect pests, stem and petiole feeders, and defoliators. Treatment and control strategies for specified insects within these groups are detailed throughout this lesson.

Grain Sorghum Insect Pests. Sorghum represents a large portion of the U.S. export industry. It is a versatile crop that is used as a grain, forage or sweet crop. It is subject to infestation by a variety of insect pests. Good production practices can help reduce infestation when sampled regularly from emergence to maturity. This course will outline how to manage for these pests in a timely and efficient way.

Course attendants will learn specifics on:

  • The major pests currently affecting corn crops in the United States today.
  • How to develop strategies to manage and control corn insect pests.
  • Early season insect pests: how to recognize, control and prevent
  • Multiple soybean fruit and pod feeders, the extent of damage each causes, and prevention techniques
  • Identify the different groups of grain sorghum pests and which insects within those groups are most harmful.
  • Identify the vegetative and grain-filling stages of plant growth.

Pollinator Stewardship

Course Description

Honey Bee Stewardship. The primary concern plaguing the bee keeping industry is the decline of honey bees around the world. Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is the leading cause behind this steady decline in honey bee numbers. There are a number of different factors affecting this decline. This course provides an outline of the best practices concerning honeybee stewardship.

Minimizing Pesticide Risk for Pollinators. Whether applying pesticides in the home garden or in a commercial setting, many of the chemical pesticides used to control insects, fungal diseases, and even weeds can hurt non-target pollinating insects, such as bees and butterflies. This section will ensure your ability to effectively and efficiently apply pesticides without harming beneficial insects.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the factors that contribute to colony collapse disorder.
  • Recognize the importance of beekeeper/grower communication.
  • Describe the importance of pollinators in agriculture and why protecting native pollinators is of great concern.
  • Outline the federal and state enforcement and compliance procedure as related to pollinator safety and alternatives to hard chemicals.

Management of Pocket Gophers

Course Description

The site of a fresh mound of soil in an otherwise manicured lawn or alfalfa field can be enough to send a landowner into a tizzy. Pocket gophers can be devastating to both lawns and agricultural fields if they are not properly controlled. The damage caused by pocket gophers can sometimes be confused with either moles or ground squirrels. There are multiple control methods available to management pocket gophers. This course will cover the basics of pocket gopher management including biology, damage, trapping, and toxicant use.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Correctly identify the difference between molehills, ground squirrel mounds, and pocket gopher mounds.
  • Describe the different types of toxicants labeled for pocket gopher management and the pros and cons to each.
  • Locate the different parts of pocket gopher burrow systems and correctly place traps in each tunnel.

Field Fumigation for Managing Vertebrate Pests

Course Description

Fumigants are pesticides that convert to a toxic gas when introduced to the atmosphere. Fumigants are used to control pests in two main areas: structures, such as homes and grain bins, and burrows, such as those created by prairie dogs, skunks, or woodchucks. This presentation will focus on the use of fumigants to effectively control burrowing animals in the field.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the various types of fumigation devices and products used to control vertebrate pests in the field
  • Understand the advantages and disadvantages of fumigation as a control method
  • Know the best practices for effective use of fumigants
  • Abide by the label restrictions to protect non-targets and applicators from harm

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