New Class for Delaware Pesticide Applicators

Check out this snippet from our new Delaware approved course-Respiratory Protection:

“Workers who need personal protective equipment are often very good at wearing types such as gloves, hard hats, hearing protection, etc, but can neglect respiratory protection. This is because while other hazards such as dropping a cement block on your foot or slicing your hand open are immediately noticeable in their damage, the damage done to your lungs from inhaling hazardous chemicals on a repeated, consistent basis is not immediately obvious. This type of hazard is known as a chronic safety hazard, which occurs over time, usually 20 to 30 years, before it becomes apparent. OSHA has its own standard dedicated to respiratory protection because this is such a large hazard to the health of workers.

There are three parts to the respiratory standard:

  • being trained on the respirator you are wearing on the job site
  • being approved to wear a respirator
  • must be fit tested

While the intention is good when employers hand out respirators to employees for job safety, it doesn't do much good if the employees are not trained on their proper use and care. Knowing how to wear the respirator correctly and keeping it in working order is critical.

Not everyone can wear a respirator. An MEQ, or medical questionnaire, must be filled out once a year and submitted to a doctor or a medical professional who can approve you to wear the respirator. This approval must be on file and filled out on work time. Since it contains your personal medical information, it must also be in a sealed file so your employer does not see what it contains. Most of the time workers can be approved to wear a respirator simply by filling out the MEQ, but sometimes the doctor will want to see them in person. If this is necessary, the worker will take a pulmonary test, which measures how well their lungs can handle the strain of wearing a respirator.

Fit testing is extremely important and must be performed once a year for each specific mask that you wear. Fit testing is different from a fit check, which is done every time you put your respirator on. When you have your respirator fit tested, you are making sure it is properly fitted to your face so you don't have a false sense of security when around respiratory hazards. A mask that is too loose or too tight will cause gaps to interrupt the seal, allowing those hazards to bypass the mask and defeating the purpose of wearing a respirator. There are two types of fit tests performed: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative fit test measures the challenge agent outside the mask, and how much of the challenge agent is inside the mask. The qualitative measures the quality of challenge agent outside the mask, and is more common than the quantitative. Banana oil, Bitrex, or stannic chloride are all examples of challenge agents used in a qualitative fit test.

Fit tests should also be performed if there are significant changes to the shape of your face through things like gastric bypass surgery, scarring, or the removal of teeth.”

The sample text above is part of our brand-new two-part course on respirator safety, which is presented in full HD Video and is available 24/7 from the convenience of your computer or mobile device. Applicators with category 1C, 03, 04, and 7C endorsements can earn 1 credit with this course toward their continuing education requirements.

Click here to visit our Delaware Pesticide Applicator page and get your CE credits today!

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Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management

Check out this snippet from our new course-Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management:

“Poa annua is commonly known as annual bluegrass in North America, but to much of Europe it is known as annual meadow-grass. In the United States, it is colloquially often called Poa which is its genus. The genus Poa includes approximately 500 species.

Common examples include: Poa pratensis or Kentucky bluegrass (also known as smooth meadow-grass); Poa trivialis or “Poa triv”, which was once commonly used to overseed greens of the southeast and is also known as rough-stalk bluegrass or rough meadow-grass. Annual bluegrass is thought to have originated from a hybrid of Poa infirma (weak bluegrass) and Poa supina (creeping meadow-grass) that occurred approximately 2.5 million years ago in the interglacial ice ages of Europe.

Annual bluegrass is widespread around the world. Its presence has been observed on all continents, including Antarctica; though, it is most prominent in temperate climates.

Annual bluegrass is an annual comprised of numerous biotypes or “populations” – many of which are capable of perenniating, meaning that they may exist in a vegetative state throughout the year, all along producing viable seed. Though perennials are much less common than the annual biotypes, they tend to occur in frequently mown or grazed scenarios in temperate climates with adequate year round moisture.

Annual bluegrass is a common constituent of most maintained turf areas around the world. It is often considered a weed, but it is also propagated as a desired turf species. In fact, some of the most lauded golf greens in the world are composed of annual bluegrass, including: Pebble Beach, Oakmont, and the more recently converted Chambers Bay.”

The sample text above is part of our brand-new course on Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management. Annual bluegrass has historically been an important weed of many, if not most, commodity and specialty crops. The extensive reliance upon herbicides as the primary means of control has led to an almost overwhelming presence of herbicide resistance. There are very few commonly utilized herbicides that annual bluegrass has not evolved resistance to – albeit often in isolated or unique populations. However, the worrying trend is that for some turf scenarios, we no longer have effective chemical means of controlling annual bluegrass. This course will discuss the currently reported cases of annual bluegrass resistance to various herbicides and how to develop an effective herbicide program.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss herbicide resistance best management practices
  • Distinguish between the different classes of herbicides and their different sites of action
  • Describe how herbicide resistance is developed and how it can be avoided

This course is presented in full HD Video and is available 24/7 from the convenience of your computer or mobile device. Head to your state’s course offering page and get started on your continuing education today!


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Georgia Pesticide Applicators: Check Out Our New Course Bundle!

Ornamental and turf pesticide applicators are required to complete 10 credits of continuing education every five-year renewal cycle. In order to make things simple for you, Certified Training Institute has put together a new course bundle for ornamental & turf applicators:

The new Ornamental & Turf Bundle contains 10 credits of category 24 training. Topics include management strategies for IPM tactics for turf and ornamental management, management of pests common to ornamental and turf, and pesticide application equipment and calibration for both ornamental and turf.

BUNDLE CONTENTS:

  • IPM for Ornamental Plant Pest Management – 1 credit
  • Common Ornamental Plant Pests – 3 credits
  • Ornamental Pesticide Application Equipment and Calibration – 1 credit
  • IPM for Turf Management – 1 credit
  • Common Turfgrass Weeds – 1 credit
  • Turfgrass Disease, Insect, and Vertebrate Pests – 1 credit
  • Cultural Practices for Turf Management – 1 credit
  • Application Equipment and Calibration – 1 credit

The bundle is conveniently priced at $129, which saves you $34 over a la carte options for the same courses.

The best part? Being able to take the courses at your own pace, wherever you want! Whether at home or out on the town, our mobile friendly platform allows you to complete courses on your schedule: with 24/7 access and helpful customer service representatives waiting to provide you with any assistance needed, completing your continuing education has never been easier!

We also have bundles ready to go to satisfy requirements for any category:

Georgia Pesticide Safety Bundle (6 credits in all categories): $99

Georgia Agricultural Plant Bundle (10 credits in category 21): $129

Georgia Right of Way Bundle (6 credits in category 27): $99

Check them out today and get your CE done on your terms!

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Utah Pollinator Stewardship

Utah pesticide applicators: pollinator stewardship is a hot topic in your state right now!

Check out the following snippets from our course on pollinator stewardship, and then click here to find the whole course (it is fully Utah state approved and counts as 1 CEU)!

 The primary concern plaguing the beekeeping industry is the decline of honey bees around the world. Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is the leading cause behind this steady decline in honey bee numbers. There are a number of different factors affecting this decline. It is important to know the best practices concerning honeybee stewardship.”

“Minimize Pesticide Risk for Pollinators: Whether applying pesticides in the home garden or in a commercial setting, many of the chemical pesticides used to control insects, fungal disease, and even weeds can hurt non-target pollinating insects, such as bees and butterflies. Ensure your ability to effectively and efficiently apply pesticides without harming beneficial insects.”

As applicators, it is important that to be aware and analyze the following prior to every pesticide application:

  • Understand the importance of pollinators in agriculture and why protecting native pollinators is of great concern.
  • Be aware of the federal and state enforcement and compliance procedures as related to pollinator safety and alternatives to hard chemicals.
  • Identify the factors that contribute to colony collapse disorder in relation to the current application.
  • Recognize the importance of beekeeper/grower communication, and communicate with local beekeepers who may be affected whenever possible.

For additional resource in relation to the topic of pollinator stewardship, check out CTI’s other course Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Stewardship (fully state approved and counts as 2 CEUs!). The Utah Department of Agriculture has some helpful resources as well which can be found here.

Careful analysis of pesticide application sites and surrounding areas can ensure the health of pollinators in our environments for years to come. Make sure you are doing your part AND earn CEUs with Certified Training Institute today!

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Free Ornamental Plant Pest Management Exam Guide

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Have you recently decided to take the Ornamental Plant Pest Management exam? Certified Training Institute has put together an exam guide to help you plan your preparation strategy for the exam.

Passing your Ornamental Plant Pest Management exam is one important step that an applicator can take in moving their career forward. For some, the exam can seem daunting, but with the right tools and guidance everyone can move forward and achieve their goals. Having the best tools and study materials for the exam is important, they are not only going to guide you on what you need to learn, but also how to learn it. Our free Ornamental Plant Pest Management exam guide will provide you with a basic understanding of what may be on your exam.

Additionally, we have included some helpful studying tips, to help you set up a study plan to fit your needs.

It also holds valuable information and strategies for passing your exam, BUT, it is only the tip of the iceberg. Certified Training Institute helps thousands of applicators pass their exams with the best Online Video Exam Prep Programs available.  Our Free Exam Guide will give you a basic outline of what is covered in the Ornamental Plant Pest Management Exam Prep Program produced by Certified Training Institute.


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Free Turfgrass Pest Management Exam Guide

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Have you recently decided to take the Turfgrass Pest Management exam? Certified Training Institute has put together an exam guide to help you plan your preparation strategy for the exam.

Passing your Turfgrass Pest Management exam is one important step that an applicator can take in moving their career forward. For some, the exam can seem daunting, but with the right tools and guidance everyone can move forward and achieve their goals. Having the best tools and study materials for the exam is important, they are not only going to guide you on what you need to learn, but also how to learn it. Our free Turfgrass Pest Management exam guide will provide you with a basic understanding of what may be on your exam.

Additionally, we have included some helpful studying tips, to help you set up a study plan to fit your needs.

It also holds valuable information and strategies for passing your exam, BUT, it is only the tip of the iceberg. Certified Training Institute helps thousands of applicators pass their exams with the best Online Video Exam Prep Programs available.  Our Free Exam Guide will give you a basic outline of what is covered in the Turfgrass Pest Management Exam Prep Program produced by Certified Training Institute.

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Free Mosquito Control Exam Guide

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Have you recently decided to take the Mosquito Control exam? Certified Training Institute has put together an exam guide to help you plan your preparation strategy for the exam.

Passing your Mosquito Control exam is one important step that an applicator can take in moving their career forward. For some, the exam can seem daunting, but with the right tools and guidance everyone can move forward and achieve their goals. Having the best tools and study materials for the exam is important, they are not only going to guide you on what you need to learn, but also how to learn it. Our free mosquito control exam guide will provide you with a basic understanding of what may be on your exam.

Additionally, we have included some helpful studying tips, to help you set up a study plan to fit your needs.

The exam guide also holds valuable information and strategies for passing your exam, BUT, it is only the tip of the iceberg. Certified Training Institute helps thousands of applicators pass their exams with the best Online Video Exam Prep Programs available.  Our Free Exam Guide will give you a basic outline of what is covered in the Mosquito Control Exam Prep Program produced by Certified Training Institute.


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Free Core Applicator Exam Guide

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Have you recently decided to take the Core Applicator exam? Certified Training Institute has put together an exam guide to help you plan your preparation strategy for the exam.

Passing your Core Applicator exam is one important step that you can take in moving your career as a pesticide applicator forward. For some, the exam can seem daunting, but with the right tools and guidance everyone can move forward and achieve their goals. Having the best tools and study materials for the exam is important, they are not only going to guide you on what you need to learn, but also how to learn it. Our free Core Applicator exam guide will provide you with a basic understanding of what may be on your exam.

Additionally, we have included some helpful studying tips, to help you set up a study plan to fit your needs.

It also holds valuable information and strategies for passing your exam, BUT, it is only the tip of the iceberg. Certified Training Institute helps thousands of applicators pass their exams with the best Online Video Exam Prep Programs available.  Our Free Exam Guide will give you a basic outline of what is covered in the Core Applicator Exam Prep Program produced by Certified Training Institute.


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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The War on Rats

If you have ever lived in or traveled to big cities in America, chances are you have seen one or more of these pesky rodents. These furry critters pose a threat to cities not only because they are annoying but also because they spread diseases and wreak havoc on your stuff. Remember learning about the Black Plague? Allegedly spread by rats, it wiped out 2/3 of the world’s population.

New York City last year set a war on rats plan into action hoping to eliminate 70% of the rats in 10 of their most infested neighborhoods. How are they hoping to accomplish this by the end of 2018? The plan is pretty simple. Eliminate their food source. NYC has more trash than any other city on earth. 33 million tons per year! The plan is to change the design of trash receptacles with a mailbox style opening. They are advising residents to keep trash contained in closed bins or dumpsters; never leave pet food uncovered outside; remove piles of debris; ensure pet waste is disposed of in sealed containers; weed and throw away rotting vegetation from gardens, and maintain bird feeders.

The newly ordained “Rat Capitol” of the U.S—Chicago, has their own plan to take back their city. The Department of Streets and Sanitation conduct preventive baiting and began a pilot program to place dry ice into rodent burrows in parks or other green spaces to suffocate the rats.

Pesticide Applicators are seeing a 30% increase in requests for rat extermination services in many big cities across the U.S. Considering rats have come out on top for thousands of years it sounds like applicators will be in business for many years to come.

 


Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

Online state-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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The Buzz in Utah on the Effect of Pesticides on Wild Bees

Humans and honeybees go way back. We’ve been raiding their hives for honey for at least 10,000 years, and we domesticated them almost 5,000 years ago. Honey bees are the most commonly used pollinator for commercial crops in the United States. But there is another bee story; the decline of wild bees.

Ultimately, it may be the more alarming story. There are over 20,000 bee species in the world, and 43 percent of them are diminishing or endangered. Most wild bees are small and solitary, nesting in holes in the ground or wood. Solitary bees face different, less understood, challenges from pesticide exposure than their colony-dwelling honeybee cousins.

In a report published last week in Environmental Entomology, Utah State University graduate student Andi Kopi and Theresa Pitts-Singer, Ph.D., of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service make the case that we need to look beyond honeybees when assessing how pesticides affect pollinators. When it comes to pesticides, we typically only check their effects on honeybees before authorizing their use, even though solitary bees may interact with these chemicals in very different ways.

The factors affecting wild bee populations are the same as those responsible for the death of honeybee colonies. It’s not just one thing, but three factors intersecting that have caused the population to diminish. It’s this interaction between pesticides, poor nutrition, and diseases and parasites that is, in fact, bringing bees populations down.

Wild bees are ecologically critical. Worldwide, more than 1,000 plant-produced food, beverages, fibers, spices, and medicines need to be pollinated. Our pollinators have enough environmental stressors, curbing the use of bird and bee-killing pesticides should be a national priority.


Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

Online state-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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