Oregon Pesticide Rules To Surpass EPA Requirements

Beginning January 1, 2019, agricultural employers with personnel who apply pesticides by spray to crops in Oregon are going to face a stricter set of rules than those set forth by the EPA. The new rules are designed to protect agricultural workers, pesticide applicators and others including their families. According to Oregon OSHA, these rules offer additional protection in multiple ways, especially in the area of the EPA's Application Exclusion Zone (AEZ), the area adjacent to be outside of the pesticide-treated area.

You'll find the notice for these new standards HERE. The state also offers an overview of additional protective measures in PDF format HERE.

Federal laws allow each state to implement their own rules regarding the protection of workers against pesticide exposure as long as it meets or exceeds those set forth by the EPA.

Certified Training Institute offers Worker Protection Standard Training for both workers and handlers. There are two programs created to fill the needs of companies small and large.

These programs will make training your agricultural workers on the Worker Protection Standard extremely easy and straightforward. You will no longer need to worry about scheduling the training, organizing the logistics, or tracking records and paperwork, their system does it all.

We also offer Exam Prep and Continuing Education in HD Video and mobile-friendly format that is available anytime 24/7 making it easy to meet your state's requirements at your own pace. Agricultural Worker Safety Training courses are offered in both English and Spanish!

 


Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

Online state-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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The Golden Duo of Agriculture: Pesticides and Fertilizer

Fertilizers and pesticides are commonplace in US agriculture, and production would not be where it is today without them.  At least three times each day, most humans and many animals consume food produced by the agricultural sector. Our cotton and natural fiber clothing are almost all produced via agriculture. Our fuels are enhanced by biofuels. While some negative effects come along with fertilizer and pesticide use, agriculture in the US and globally cannot achieve production in sufficient quantities for a population forecast to reach 10 billion by 2050 without it.

Nitrogen, phosphate, and potash are essential in the production of crops used for human consumption, animal feed, fiber, and fuel. Applied annually, most of these nutrients are absorbed by the crop. Fertilizers and pesticides have a long history of use in the US and are considered important components of modern farming. Fertilizers are used to supply crops with essential nutrients and to help replenish key elements to the soil once a crop has extracted them during the growth process.

U.S. crop producers use a variety of practices to reduce yield losses to pests. For example, chemical pesticides, including herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides, are usually applied by spraying the fields. Pesticides protect plants from weeds, insect damage, and diseases.  Herbicides control grass and broadleaf weeds that steal sunlight, water, and nutrients from our desired crops.

The ultimate goal of fertilizer and pesticide use is to produce the best crop possible while minimizing environmental harm. Research and advancements in technology are making these goals a reality. Nearly all inputs can now be more precisely applied than ever before. This capacity will continue to improve in the future. Producers may have the capability to manage individual plants across large agricultural fields in a real-time, automated fashion. These advancements will help ensure proper stewardship of agriculture inputs that help feed, clothe, and fuel a rapidly growing human population.


Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

Online state-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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