Nevada Certified Applicator FAQ’s

Nevada and federal laws require that only certified applicators apply or supervise the application of Restricted-Use Pesticides (RUP). Nevada Certified Pesticide Applicators (RUP certificate holders) must recertify every four years from the date of initial certification. The following are frequently asked questions regarding Nevada Certified Pesticide Applicators:

How do I become a Nevada Certified Applicator?

To become certified in Nevada applicators must pass an exam which is administered by the Department of Agriculture.

How do I schedule an exam to become a Nevada Certified Applicator?

Exams may be scheduled by contacting any Nevada Department of Agriculture office.

What should I study to be prepared for my exam?

The Nevada Department of Agriculture recommends studying the National Core and National Soil Fumigation manuals. We offer an online exam prep program based on the National Core manual that includes practice exam questions to help you gauge your test readiness.

I’ve passed my exam, what now?

Once you pass your exam, you should fill out the application for restricted use pesticide certification (find it under the Applications section). Once complete, submit and any required fees to your local Department of Agriculture office.

How do I renew my Nevada applicator certification?

Each four year renewal cycle you will need to complete one of two activities—either take and pass another exam, or complete 12 hours of state approved continuing education.

Do the 12 CEU’s need to be on specific topics?

Yes, at least 2 of the CEU’s must be on topics regarding pesticide laws. The rest may be on laws or more general topics relating to the application of pesticides.

Who can I contact with further questions?

Contact the Nevada Department of Agriculture. Their main phone number is (775) 353-3601.

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International Year of Plant Health

The UN has declared 2020 the International Year of Plant Health.

The goal of this year long celebration is to raise public awareness on “how protecting plant health can help end hunger, reduce poverty, protect the environment, and boost economic development.” The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimates that “up to 40% of food crops are lost to plant pests and diseases annually.”

The following list is based on the FAO’s suggestions for helping to raise awareness for plant health across the globe, and we’ve added a couple of our own suggestions as well.

  1. Be careful when bringing plants and plant products across borders
    Speak with your vendors and suppliers about whether they are taking steps to mitigate the spread of undesirable contaminants. Being aware of the policies others have in place can help you to take steps to protect your investments as well.
  2. Comply with local and federal plant health standards
    Complying with guidelines and laws helps protect you AND your plants.
  3. Consider implementing Integrated Pest Management practices
    Research is emerging daily on environmentally friendly ways to manage pests, and these IPM strategies could help you save the environment as well as your crops.
  4. Reach out to policy makers
    Not everyone is aware of the issues surrounding plant health, and policy makers are no exception. Consider asking for a public awareness campaign, suggest changes to local policies, or ask them to invest in innovative plant research. Every little bit helps.
  5. Implement (or re-evaluate) plant monitoring policies
    Early detection is often key to controlling the spread. If you don’t already, consider implementing plant monitoring policies. Or if you do have these policies, perhaps re-evaluate them to see if improvements can be made.
  6. Research and share locally
    If you are on social media, talk to your audience about these issues. Point them to local resources like the DNR or your state’s Department of Agriculture to find out more about what they can do to help the cause. If you’re not on social media, consider talking to people at networking or other social events about the issues.

The FAO has also provided a list of resources and strategies to help raise public awareness, and if you are interested in spreading the word, we suggest checking that out too. There is a ton of information free to share with people, and resources to help you get the word out.

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Inspecting Homes for Pests

pest inspection/WDO inspection involves a full inspection of a home for any evidence of termite activity and/or evidence of dry rot damage, or moisture conditions that could lead to an atmosphere for wood destroying organisms or termites. It’s called a WDO because termites are not the only wood destroying organisms in the world. This means that a pest inspector would inspect the exterior of a home including all the trim, home siding, under roof eaves, ect. Additionally, the inspector will point out conducive conditions that could lead to a new termite infestation, or support an existing termite infestation. This includes firewood and other debris stored against the home, wood siding contact with the soil, and grade that does not slope away from the foundation. Pest Inspectors do a full inspection of the interior as well, specifically checking for water leaks in the bathrooms, kitchen and laundry areas, windows, and inspecting the attic where applicable.

Termites cause more than $5 billion in property damage each year and are known as “silent destroyers” because of their ability to chew through wood, flooring and even wallpaper undetected. Home Buyers and Sellers are always surprised to find out that a pest inspection is helping make sure the structure is intact and will remain intact. The new home market is a big industry that applicators can tap into by adding general/structural categories to their current licenses. For those that currently have this category and need CE we here at Certified Training Institute offer a variety of courses to choose from.

Certified Training Institute offers state-approved continuing education courses that are available online from any internet enabled device - which means your classes are available when you are. Have a few minutes between client meetings? Why not watch a segment or two of a video course! Is the weather not cooperating with your planned applications? Take the day and knock out a couple hours of your required continuing education!

Choose your state below to view the available courses or call our office to speak with a licensing expert for help getting started!

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Invasive or Non-native? What’s the difference?

Invasive plant species have been a hot topic in recent months. Everything from wild mustard to milfoil. But it wasn’t until I was at a city commission meeting with my daughter a few months ago that I realized that non-native seems to have become synonymous with invasive: there was some construction work that needed to be done and the contractor was wanting to have 60 year old Chinese Elm trees removed citing them as invasive.

As I was watching these city commissioners nod their heads in agreement while discussing the removal of these big beautiful trees I realized than many if not all of the commissioners weren’t aware of the difference between invasive plants and non-native plants.

So what is the difference between invasive plant species and non-native plant species? According to the Michigan Invasive Species home page, “An invasive species is one that is not native and whose introduction causes harm, or is likely to cause harm to Michigan’s economy, environment, or human health.”

The key words here are “causes harm.”

In Michigan, an invasive species that is getting a lot of attention right now is garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolate). Garlic mustard thrives in wooded areas and can tolerate deep shade, partly because it emerges and blooms before trees develop leaves in the spring. It’s choking out the native plants causing harm to the ecosystem.

Another invasive that’s getting a lot of attention is giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). The sap of the giant hogweed can cause a severe skin reaction that can cause the skin to blister when exposed to the sun. This invasive plant causes harm to humans.

Both of these plants are invasive.

However, let’s look at a well-known landscape plant – the hosta. Hostas are native to Asia. They have become a very popular plant for shaded plantings. They are non-native, but not invasive. Another example is purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) which is a popular plant for sunny locations and even has some medicinal properties. And while both of these examples are spreaders, they are not invaders as they cause no harm to surrounding ecosystems.

The short version is to remember that non-native does not equal invasive, select plants for the landscape that are best suited to each planting site, and consult your state’s invasive plant species list before planting.

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Hope in the Fight Against the Spotted Lanternfly

Agricultural producers in Pennsylvania and surrounding states have been battling the Spotted Lanternfly since 2014. Management and control of this invasive species has been a major feat in the United States, and farmers in uninfected areas live with the fear that these hard to deal with bugs may move into their areas.

Since the first invasion of Spotted Lanternflies five years ago, scientists have been actively studying the creature and looking for ways to control them, however, results have been largely disappointing, and the lanternflies continue to spread.

These particular bugs have a highly varied diet, as they are able to subsist on over 70 plant species. They also are hard to keep contained to one area, as they will lay their eggs on any available surface. This leads to easy transmission from area to area, and despite quarantine efforts the lanternflies can now be found in five states throughout the northeastern United States.

However, according to Popular Science, researchers at Cornell University may have had a breakthrough recently. Two particular species of fungi, Batkoa major and Beauveria bassiana, may be farmer’s best hope for controlling Spotted Lanternfly populations.

The fungi seem to bog down the lanternflies—when infected with Batkoa major, the overgrowth of the fungus adheres the Spotted Lanternflies to trunks of trees, and when infected with Beauveria bassiana, the lanternflies are often found dead on the ground.

Scientists were at first baffled when agricultural officials began finding dead lanternflies covered with white fuzz.  DNA and culture tests were run on the fuzz, and it was found to be these fungi. Since these initial findings, scientists have begun looking into the possibility of utilizing one or both fungi as part of a pest management strategy to control the Spotted Lanternfly in other areas.

While more research must still be conducted, scientists are hopeful that these fungi will help reduce populations of the Spotted Lanternfly.

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New Class for Delaware Pesticide Applicators

Check out this snippet from our new Delaware approved course-Respiratory Protection:

“Workers who need personal protective equipment are often very good at wearing types such as gloves, hard hats, hearing protection, etc, but can neglect respiratory protection. This is because while other hazards such as dropping a cement block on your foot or slicing your hand open are immediately noticeable in their damage, the damage done to your lungs from inhaling hazardous chemicals on a repeated, consistent basis is not immediately obvious. This type of hazard is known as a chronic safety hazard, which occurs over time, usually 20 to 30 years, before it becomes apparent. OSHA has its own standard dedicated to respiratory protection because this is such a large hazard to the health of workers.

There are three parts to the respiratory standard:

  • being trained on the respirator you are wearing on the job site
  • being approved to wear a respirator
  • must be fit tested

While the intention is good when employers hand out respirators to employees for job safety, it doesn't do much good if the employees are not trained on their proper use and care. Knowing how to wear the respirator correctly and keeping it in working order is critical.

Not everyone can wear a respirator. An MEQ, or medical questionnaire, must be filled out once a year and submitted to a doctor or a medical professional who can approve you to wear the respirator. This approval must be on file and filled out on work time. Since it contains your personal medical information, it must also be in a sealed file so your employer does not see what it contains. Most of the time workers can be approved to wear a respirator simply by filling out the MEQ, but sometimes the doctor will want to see them in person. If this is necessary, the worker will take a pulmonary test, which measures how well their lungs can handle the strain of wearing a respirator.

Fit testing is extremely important and must be performed once a year for each specific mask that you wear. Fit testing is different from a fit check, which is done every time you put your respirator on. When you have your respirator fit tested, you are making sure it is properly fitted to your face so you don't have a false sense of security when around respiratory hazards. A mask that is too loose or too tight will cause gaps to interrupt the seal, allowing those hazards to bypass the mask and defeating the purpose of wearing a respirator. There are two types of fit tests performed: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative fit test measures the challenge agent outside the mask, and how much of the challenge agent is inside the mask. The qualitative measures the quality of challenge agent outside the mask, and is more common than the quantitative. Banana oil, Bitrex, or stannic chloride are all examples of challenge agents used in a qualitative fit test.

Fit tests should also be performed if there are significant changes to the shape of your face through things like gastric bypass surgery, scarring, or the removal of teeth.”

The sample text above is part of our brand-new two-part course on respirator safety, which is presented in full HD Video and is available 24/7 from the convenience of your computer or mobile device. Applicators with category 1C, 03, 04, and 7C endorsements can earn 1 credit with this course toward their continuing education requirements.

Click here to visit our Delaware Pesticide Applicator page and get your CE credits today!

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Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management

Check out this snippet from our new course-Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management:

“Poa annua is commonly known as annual bluegrass in North America, but to much of Europe it is known as annual meadow-grass. In the United States, it is colloquially often called Poa which is its genus. The genus Poa includes approximately 500 species.

Common examples include: Poa pratensis or Kentucky bluegrass (also known as smooth meadow-grass); Poa trivialis or “Poa triv”, which was once commonly used to overseed greens of the southeast and is also known as rough-stalk bluegrass or rough meadow-grass. Annual bluegrass is thought to have originated from a hybrid of Poa infirma (weak bluegrass) and Poa supina (creeping meadow-grass) that occurred approximately 2.5 million years ago in the interglacial ice ages of Europe.

Annual bluegrass is widespread around the world. Its presence has been observed on all continents, including Antarctica; though, it is most prominent in temperate climates.

Annual bluegrass is an annual comprised of numerous biotypes or “populations” – many of which are capable of perenniating, meaning that they may exist in a vegetative state throughout the year, all along producing viable seed. Though perennials are much less common than the annual biotypes, they tend to occur in frequently mown or grazed scenarios in temperate climates with adequate year round moisture.

Annual bluegrass is a common constituent of most maintained turf areas around the world. It is often considered a weed, but it is also propagated as a desired turf species. In fact, some of the most lauded golf greens in the world are composed of annual bluegrass, including: Pebble Beach, Oakmont, and the more recently converted Chambers Bay.”

The sample text above is part of our brand-new course on Annual Bluegrass Resistance Management. Annual bluegrass has historically been an important weed of many, if not most, commodity and specialty crops. The extensive reliance upon herbicides as the primary means of control has led to an almost overwhelming presence of herbicide resistance. There are very few commonly utilized herbicides that annual bluegrass has not evolved resistance to – albeit often in isolated or unique populations. However, the worrying trend is that for some turf scenarios, we no longer have effective chemical means of controlling annual bluegrass. This course will discuss the currently reported cases of annual bluegrass resistance to various herbicides and how to develop an effective herbicide program.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Discuss herbicide resistance best management practices
  • Distinguish between the different classes of herbicides and their different sites of action
  • Describe how herbicide resistance is developed and how it can be avoided

This course is presented in full HD Video and is available 24/7 from the convenience of your computer or mobile device. Head to your state’s course offering page and get started on your continuing education today!


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Home Lawn and Landscape Management

The lawn and landscape are essential elements in any residential situation. Time and money are invested in the development, installation and upkeeping of the landscaping and the turf. When not installed or managed properly that investment can be perceived as a waste as the lawn and landscape do not fulfill their purpose.

Do you know the essentials of designing a landscape that is aesthetically pleasing and makes weed control easier? Are you familiar with key factors for installing and establishing a functional home lawn?

If not, then Certified Training Institute has a new course to meet your continuing education requirements as well as help you gain an understanding of these important topics. This course will cover key design elements that will help you create a low maintenance landscape for your client.

The course covers a range of topics including:

Weed Management Strategies for the Landscape-

  • Landscape Weed Management
  • Pre-emergence herbicides for landscapes
  • Selective herbicides for landscapes

Home Lawn Management-

  • Roles of a lawn
  • Selecting a grass species: Key questions
  • Global turf types
  • Growth cycles
  • Warm or cool season turf?
  • Turf identification
  • Use of cool-season grasses in warm-season climates
  • Considerations for lawn establishment
  • Proper fertilization
  • Soil testing
  • …and many more!

This course is presented in full HD Video and is available 24/7 from the convenience of your computer or mobile device. Head to your state’s course offering page and get started on your continuing education today!


Online Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Certified Crop Adviser Recertification FAQ

Everything you need to know to renew your Certified Crop Adviser Certification.

Once I become a Certified Crop Adviser, how do I maintain my certification?

  1. Earn 40 hours of continuing education units every 2 years by December 31st.
  2. Pay an annual renewal fee

Are your continuing education courses approved for CCA CEU Credit by the American Society of Agronomy?

Yes, many of our courses are approved by the American Society of Agronomy Board. On the state pages, the course description will say “Approved for Certified Crop Adviser Credit”.

As a Certified Crop Adviser, am I required to take continuing education units in certain areas or topics?

Yes, the continuing education units you complete must fall within certain topic guidelines. The topic breakdown is as follows:

In each two year cycle, a CCA must complete a minimum of 5 CEUs in each of the 4 categories, the categories are: Nutrient Management, Soil and Water Management, Pest Management, and Crop Management.

At least 20 of the 40 total CEUs must be board approved.

Can I use your courses for credit for CCA continuing education requirements as well as my state licensing re-certification requirements?

Yes, absolutely! Any course that is approved for Certified Crop Adviser Credit can also be used for state pesticide applicator continuing education credits.


Online Certified Crop Adviser & Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

State-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7

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Georgia Pesticide Applicators: Check Out Our New Course Bundle!

Ornamental and turf pesticide applicators are required to complete 10 credits of continuing education every five-year renewal cycle. In order to make things simple for you, Certified Training Institute has put together a new course bundle for ornamental & turf applicators:

The new Ornamental & Turf Bundle contains 10 credits of category 24 training. Topics include management strategies for IPM tactics for turf and ornamental management, management of pests common to ornamental and turf, and pesticide application equipment and calibration for both ornamental and turf.

BUNDLE CONTENTS:

  • IPM for Ornamental Plant Pest Management – 1 credit
  • Common Ornamental Plant Pests – 3 credits
  • Ornamental Pesticide Application Equipment and Calibration – 1 credit
  • IPM for Turf Management – 1 credit
  • Common Turfgrass Weeds – 1 credit
  • Turfgrass Disease, Insect, and Vertebrate Pests – 1 credit
  • Cultural Practices for Turf Management – 1 credit
  • Application Equipment and Calibration – 1 credit

The bundle is conveniently priced at $129, which saves you $34 over a la carte options for the same courses.

The best part? Being able to take the courses at your own pace, wherever you want! Whether at home or out on the town, our mobile friendly platform allows you to complete courses on your schedule: with 24/7 access and helpful customer service representatives waiting to provide you with any assistance needed, completing your continuing education has never been easier!

We also have bundles ready to go to satisfy requirements for any category:

Georgia Pesticide Safety Bundle (6 credits in all categories): $99

Georgia Agricultural Plant Bundle (10 credits in category 21): $129

Georgia Right of Way Bundle (6 credits in category 27): $99

Check them out today and get your CE done on your terms!

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